Advice

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  • Advice

    Candice Gordon…Got the Part

    After years of being a Back Stage subscriber, Candice Gordon was thrilled to land the lead role of Diane Harris in "What If?," an Off-Off-Broadway production at Manhattan's Chernuchin Theatre.

  • Advice

    CD Wendy O'Brien on What She's Looking For

    She currently handles "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," "Sons of Anarchy," "Men of a Certain Age," and "Teen Wolf," as well as slew of pilots—and she loves her job.

  • Advice

    How does a Standup Comic Land a Spot on Late-Night TV?

    I scout local clubs and industry showcases as often as possible, although the majority of our submissions come in via YouTube links or DVDs.

  • Advice

    To Improvise or not to Improvise

    "Although we can't ask anyone to improvise"—because of Screen Actors Guild rules—"people will expect you to be able to," says David Cady.

  • Advice

    A Trio of Worthy Dance Books

    Three new publications take fresh looks at ballet history, making choreography, and the writings of Agnes de Mille.

  • Advice

    Kissing Caution

    I am auditioning for a part that requires me to kiss someone I've never met. How can I be certain this person is not sick and doesn't have any easily transmittable diseases, such as herpes?

  • Advice

    It Takes a Village to Satisfy a Comedian

    It is a lot easier to make a room full of 500 people laugh than it is to make a handful of people, even if they are your friends, laugh.

  • Advice

    Bridgette Bassa… Got the Part

    When Missouri transplant Bridgette Bassa spied the casting notice for "Indestructible," one thing stood out to her: It was for writer-director Daniel Myrick of "The Blair Witch Project."

  • Advice

    Getting Dropped Part 2: The Five Phases of Grief

    There's a right way and a wrong way to drop an actor. The worst thing an agent can do is send an email. Taking human interaction out of the equation makes getting dropped a hundred times worse.

  • Advice

    Across the Ponder

    I was wondering if you could lend any insight into the experience of trying to be a working American actor in the U.K. Are they generally accepting or do they prefer it if you attended drama school in the U.K.?