Advice

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  • Advice

    David Greenspan Discusses Playing All Eight Characters in 'The Patsy'

    During the last few months, an undisputed New York theater highlight was David Greenspan taking on all eight roles in the Transport Group's revival of "The Patsy."

  • Advice

    Maria Niora

    First impressions can make all the difference, and no one knows that better than Maria Niora. Born in Athens, Greece, she moved to New York City almost three years ago.

  • Advice

    Bargains in Los Angeles

    Yes, the recession has prompted L.A. actors to be ever more intrepid. Try these bargains, or contact us and let us know what else you've been doing to save money.

  • Advice

    Dance Film Lab Aids Young Dance Filmmakers

    The monthly Dance Films Association series at Dance New Amsterdam, organized by Zach Morris, promotes the work of up-and-coming dance filmmakers.

  • Advice

    Blurring the Line Between Onstage and Off

    Burned out after a decade waiting tables, and thinking my playwriting career had peaked, I was finally determined to get a "real" job. Then I checked my voice mail.

  • Advice

    Tara Henderson

    After submitting to a casting notice she saw in Back Stage, Tara Henderson auditioned and was one of five people cast—out of approximately 700 submissions and 250 auditioning performers.

  • Advice

    Lost Equity, Double Jeopardy

    I'd like to join Equity, but it's been many years since I earned all those weeks in the EMC program. I am really nervous that I've blown it by missing the deadline. Will I have to start from scratch?

  • Advice

    In Appreciation of the Actor

    "When writing a play, I find it helpful to imagine specific actors in the roles."

  • Advice

    A Pioneer in Representing Dancers

    "I had a really bad knee injury and basically had to reinvent my life," explains Julie McDonald of McDonald/Selznick Associates, a talent agency that specializes in dancers and choreographers.

  • Advice

    Permission to Laugh Again

    Ten years ago, "Saturday Night Live" gave a grieving America permission to laugh again. Certainly, no sane person could find humor in the horror that was Sept. 11, 2001.