Advice

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  • Advice

    Replete With Misinformation

    I write in response to Back Stage's April 1 opinion piece by Sam Mraovich entitled "Forget the Unions, Make a Film."

  • Advice

    Commitment Issues

    It's risky to burn bridges, even when you know it's necessary. But I knew I had to follow my instincts. It was never that school I had chosen to commit to—it was acting.

  • Advice

    Agency Blues, AFTRA Dues

    "I signed with my agent before I knew much about the industry. I know now that I should have gotten more experience and training before seeking representation."

  • Advice

    Erik McKay

    Erik McKay's persistent approach to his career certainly paid off when he landed the lead role of Detective Al Barden in the nonunion feature filmAsbury Forever.

  • Advice

    Can an Actor Infer from a CD's Thank You?

    I try to be kind and warm. I wouldn't quite say neutral, but I don't want to lead someone on. I try to give an honest assessment but at the same time be kind.

  • Advice

    Turning Pro

    Acting school is an important tool to help you become an artist. However, a professional is defined as "one who follows an occupation as a means of livelihood or for gain."

  • Advice

    Agents: Another Option to Signing (Without Spending $$)

    How can you additionally pick the lock of the gatekeepers and land an agent? There's one more way to breaking down the vault door to your champion of talent: Me.

  • Advice

    Forbidden Question, Meeting Challenges

    "I usually book roles five years younger than I am. I would honestly prefer not to disclose my age, as I believe it alters their perception of me for the role."

  • Advice

    Clayton Farris

    When Clayton Farris got the part of Paul in “Kiss Me Kate” at the Glendale Centre Theatre, he knew a dream of his would be realized: He'd get to sing and dance to the iconic “Too Darn Hot.”

  • Advice

    Lee Perkins

    It was no wonder Lee Perkins -- racecar driver, baseball player, and actor -- got cast inGandhi at the Bat, a digital newsreel-style film set in 1933.