The Craft

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  • Advice

    You Can't Think and Act

    The great philosopher Yogi Berra once said, "You can't think and hit a baseball at the same time." Those words of wisdom hold true for a lot of other things too, including improvising on stage.

  • Advice

    On Directing Kids

    "Young actors have an advanced understanding of the thought processes of people," asserts Robert Kelley, of the Bay Area's TheatreWorks, in the midst of directing two preteens and a teen in "To Kill a Mockingbird."

  • Advice

    All Alone

    Solo theater is not standup comedy. Solo theater is acting. You take the emotional journey—as every character in the play.

  • Advice

    You Can't Fake It

    Here are some signs that you might not be acting totally truthfully: unnatural body language, movement that's general, an unctuous tone in your voice.

  • Advice

    Summer Shakespeare in the City

    Al Pacino will play Shylock in "The Merchant of Venice" in a production directed by Daniel Sullivan that will run at Central Park's Delacorte Theater alongside "The Winter's Tale."

  • Advice

    Something to Not Think About

    Whether it's for a play, a commercial, episodic television, or a feature film, how you approach a role is the most essential decision you can make as an actor.

  • Advice

    When Women Age

    How do older women relate to the ages of their characters? And what do they know now about the craft of acting that they didn't know when they were younger?

  • Advice

    When Men Age

    There is much to be learned from playing characters older than yourself when the chance arises.

  • Advice

    Auditioning for Pilots

    Reality-check time: As Los Angeles acting teacher Doug Warhit reminds us, most pilots don't go beyond the pilot stage. Of those that do, most are canceled within the first four weeks.

  • Advice

    Everything Matters

    Speaking with Back Stage, Olympia Dukakis and Marco Barricelli touched on many subjects related to the craft of acting.