The Craft

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  • Advice

    Avoiding a Common ‘Actor Trap'

    Acting teacher Anthony Vincent Bova advises that actors can't shut down uncomfortable emotions if they want to convey them onstage.

  • Advice

    Look to Express in an Audition, Not Impress

    Kimberly Vaughn, of Kimberly Vaughn Performance Studio, urges actors to head into an audition looking to express emotion, rather than impress the table.

  • Advice

    Write Without Yourself in Mind

    Eileen Rivera, a New York-based writer and producer, found writing becomes much more effective if she didn't write herself into her plays.

  • Advice

    Playing Lawyers

    While acting skills and legal skills are not completely interchangeable, there is nevertheless plenty that actors can learn from watching real lawyers in action.

  • Advice

    What Is This Thing Called Craft?

    Lee Strasberg once said, "Every actor needs a craft which is commensurate with his talent." Stella Adler said, "Without craft there can be no art."

  • Advice

    The Root of Good Acting (Pt. 4)

    The first common mistake that will lead you down a very bad path is judging the character.  To me, the root of all prejudice stems from our inability to see ourselves in other people.

  • Advice

    Are You Director-Proof?

    Most directors struggle to speak the actor’s language. While some take an interest in the craft—even signing up for the occasional acting class—others have no idea what we do.

  • Advice

    The Character of You

    Teacher Matt Hoverman shares his three keys to successful autobiographical solo shows.

  • Advice

    ACTeen's Rita Litton on Objectives for Young Actors

    Acting is doing. An actor doesn't come onstage to feel an emotion but to do something. An actor should choose a strong objective.

  • Advice

    They Call It 'Crafting'

    In the acting world, "crafting" is a popular word. But I don't know if the meaning of the word is really understood. Crafting begins and ends with the fundamentals of acting.