Dance

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  • Advice

    Preservation Call: Jazz Dance

    Calling all jazz dancers! Old-school jazz, that is—and your age doesn't matter. New York–based jazz dance teacher Sue Samuels is forming a new dance company, Jazz Roots, featuring choreography in traditional jazz styles from the 1960s and '70s.

  • Advice

    Dancing Into Downtown L.A.

    City Ballet of Los Angeles teams with Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts.

  • Advice

    Dancing Til They Drop

    The reception area of Manhattan's Broadway Dance Center is the proverbial beehive of activity—if you can imagine bees wearing leg warmers and ballet slippers.

  • Advice

    Dancing Their Way to Injury

    As the environment and schedule of the professional dancer intensifies, the body morphs in potentially damaging ways to attempt to maintain its health.

  • Advice

    Talkin' Jazz With Ben Vereen

    A master interpreter of Fosse's style of Broadway jazz dance, Ben Vereen is also an accomplished singer and celebrated dramatic actor, perhaps best known for his performance as Chicken George in television's "Roots."

  • Advice

    New Choreographers on the Block

    Dancemakers for New York City Ballet, Off-Broadway, and "Smash" share their audition and rehearsal room requirements.

  • Advice

    Keeping in Step With Irish Dance

    This summer is a perfect time to catch up with the world of Irish dance. If you missed the St. Patrick's Day premiere and spring run of the Irish-dance film "Lord of the Dance 3D," you can now see it on DVD.

  • Advice

    Thodos Dance Chicago Creates a Space for New Dance Makers

    Melissa Thodos' troupe presents dancer-choreographed "New Dances," followed by a summer intensive for budding artists.

  • Advice

    Making a Professional Dance Home in the City

    The key is to find a home base in New York, a place that will embrace your talents and support your work, so you don't feel like a stranger in a foreign land.

  • Advice

    Circus Dreams

    It's such a clichéd fantasy—running away and joining the circus. But if you're a highly expressive dancer with a creative bent and an interest in long-term employment, you may want to seriously consider it.