Casting Advice

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  • Advice

    Thinking Outside the Box

    Barbara McNamara, who has headed her own company in New York, Barbara McNamara Casting, for four years, casts films, TV shows, commercials, voiceovers, and industrials.

  • Advice

    Spreading Their Wings

    "We’ve got great memories for talent. One or the other of us will remember someone that we’ve seen two years ago that came in to audition."

  • Advice

    Actors: Ill-Mannered and Indebted

    Several months ago as I was going through the piles of actor mail I came across a familiar piece of "Thanks for the audition... " correspondence but it had an odd twist.

  • Advice

    The Business of Auditioning

    I've sort of become the Sherlock Holmes of reading résumés. My job as a casting director is to present the very best talent available for the project.

  • Advice

    The King of Commercials

    With 3,500 spots under his belt and a decade-and-a-half stint as president of the Commercial Casting Directors Association, there's no question that he knows his way around the ad world.

  • Advice

    Audition As If You're Rehearsing

    Todd Thaler launched his career as a casting director 25 years ago by overseeing background casting for Woody Allen, a position he held on 14 of Allen's films.

  • Advice

    Acting Job Opportunities Lost and Won

    This actor knew that here was an opportunity to introduce himself to gate keepers. He was right to begin a conversation. Where did he go wrong?

  • Advice

    'Case' Study

    Though he's never had acting aspirations of his own, casting director Michael Testa feels a special kinship with actors.

  • Advice

    Actor Angst: Getting Seen

    Just how do you get past the barbarian gatekeepers—re: casting personnel and/or agents—is often as frustrating as getting a NYC subway train that doesn't reek of urine.

  • Advice

    Pass the Remote

    One might say that G. Charles Wright has spent his whole life preparing for a job in casting. "All my childhood was spent in front of a television instead of playing outdoors or doing homework," he says.