Casting Advice

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  • Advice

    1 Way Kerry Barden Maintained Authenticity in 'Get On Up'

    Kerry Barden shares how he found actors who could handle the musicality while authentically portraying the real life superstars that populated James Brown's life in "Get On Up."

  • Advice

    Spreading Their Wings

    "We’ve got great memories for talent. One or the other of us will remember someone that we’ve seen two years ago that came in to audition."

  • Advice

    Actors: Ill-Mannered and Indebted

    Several months ago as I was going through the piles of actor mail I came across a familiar piece of "Thanks for the audition... " correspondence but it had an odd twist.

  • Advice

    Thinking Outside the Box

    Barbara McNamara, who has headed her own company in New York, Barbara McNamara Casting, for four years, casts films, TV shows, commercials, voiceovers, and industrials.

  • Advice

    The Business of Auditioning

    I've sort of become the Sherlock Holmes of reading résumés. My job as a casting director is to present the very best talent available for the project.

  • Advice

    The King of Commercials

    With 3,500 spots under his belt and a decade-and-a-half stint as president of the Commercial Casting Directors Association, there's no question that he knows his way around the ad world.

  • Advice

    'Case' Study

    Though he's never had acting aspirations of his own, casting director Michael Testa feels a special kinship with actors.

  • Advice

    Audition As If You're Rehearsing

    Todd Thaler launched his career as a casting director 25 years ago by overseeing background casting for Woody Allen, a position he held on 14 of Allen's films.

  • Advice

    Acting Job Opportunities Lost and Won

    This actor knew that here was an opportunity to introduce himself to gate keepers. He was right to begin a conversation. Where did he go wrong?

  • Advice

    Actor Angst: Getting Seen

    Just how do you get past the barbarian gatekeepers—re: casting personnel and/or agents—is often as frustrating as getting a NYC subway train that doesn't reek of urine.