Singing Advice

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  • Advice

    Teaching Yourself a Dialect

    Knowing what to listen for, how to break it down, how to practice, and then turning your work into something that will convince a native speaker is not easy to do, at least without a little guidance.

  • Advice

    Juilliard Coach Andrew Wade Gives Emergency Vocal Tips

    There are five parts to Wade's immediate approach: breathing, steaming, drinking water, humming and—just to be certain suspected pharyngitis isn't actually laryngitis—see a physician.

  • Advice

    Rescuing Voices

    Dave Stroud is a Los Angeles–based voice teacher who has been called to rescue many a tour or recording session.

  • Advice

    Teaching Unfamiliar Accents

    Plays borrowed from the headlines are not an uncommon phenomenon, and nowadays plays inspired in one way or another by international relations are hardly unexpected.

  • Advice

    Creating Your Commercial Demo

    There are as many types of voiceover demo, but usually, when people ask if you have a voiceover demo, they really mean a commercial voiceover demo.

  • Advice

    Fear of Singing

    "When working with new clients, I always begin by trying to ascertain what it is about their voices that they perceive as problematic or would like to improve."

  • Advice

    Modern Melismas and More

    In contemporary styles such as pop, R&B, and jazz, vocal improvisation is a vital component of an exciting performance. But many well-trained singers can freeze up when asked to improvise.

  • Advice

    Singing With Mr. Darcy

    A tall, good-looking lad—he wouldn't have been playing Mr. Darcy if he weren't—Doug Carpenter more than once refers to singing as his passion.

  • Advice

    Acting Your 16 Bars

    Musical theater hopefuls sing their 16 carefully chosen bars at open calls. One after another, they belt their highest notes as loud as they can and then...nothing except a thank you.

  • Advice

    Angela Michael Teaches Others How to Maximize Their Vocal Palette

    Singers attempting to enter the professional ranks often find that being gifted and well-trained is not enough. They need to develop a range of vocal sounds, textures, and colors to meet every musical situation.