Singing Advice

Sort by:

  • Advice

    A Master Class With Michael Feinstein

    By the time the two hours had elapsed in Michael Feinstein's master class, he had encountered—and made strides to correct—just about every problem faced by both new and seasoned singers.

  • Advice

    You Could Drive a Truck Through It

    Nashville-based voice coach Brett Manning is one of the most recognized names in vocal instruction. Manning has also created the only CD instruction course dealing solely with vibrato.

  • Advice

    Rocker on Broadway

    Reeve Carney talks about the vocal challenges of being Spider-Man in Julie Taymor's megamusical with music and lyrics by Bono and the Edge of U2.

  • Advice

    Those Fabulous Phonemes

    So here was Jess Platt—who admits, "I'm not cheap"—assigned to make an Englishman and an Australian sound like geographically specific Middle Americans in "A Steady Rain."

  • Advice

    Getting Actors to Sing

    Voice teacher Roger Love has helped prepare Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon for "Walk the Line" and Jeff Bridges and Colin Farrell for "Crazy Heart," among many others.

  • Advice

    Audition Tension

    Nancy Mayans thinks about what happens to the body as concern mounts. She worries that the result could be the actor's body tightening before an audition.

  • Advice

    Manchester's Master Class

    The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Melissa Manchester offers her expertise to five young performers in her YoungArts' In the Studio master class.

  • Advice

    Going Mic-less

    Under theater conditions, the unenhanced power of the human voice has been severely challenged since, well, probably 1964, when Carol Channing was amplified in "Hello, Dolly!"

  • Advice

    David Greenspan Discusses Playing All Eight Characters in 'The Patsy'

    During the last few months, an undisputed New York theater highlight was David Greenspan taking on all eight roles in the Transport Group's revival of "The Patsy."

  • Advice

    Mistakes Better Not Be Made

    Michael Shannon navigates 100 minutes of roller-coaster speech in his Off-Broadway triumph. How does he do it? Lots of water and no phone calls.