Singing Advice

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  • Advice

    Teaching Yourself a Dialect

    Knowing what to listen for, how to break it down, how to practice, and then turning your work into something that will convince a native speaker is not easy to do, at least without a little guidance.

  • Advice

    Juilliard Coach Andrew Wade Gives Emergency Vocal Tips

    There are five parts to Wade's immediate approach: breathing, steaming, drinking water, humming and—just to be certain suspected pharyngitis isn't actually laryngitis—see a physician.

  • Advice

    Teaching Unfamiliar Accents

    Plays borrowed from the headlines are not an uncommon phenomenon, and nowadays plays inspired in one way or another by international relations are hardly unexpected.

  • Advice

    Rescuing Voices

    Dave Stroud is a Los Angeles–based voice teacher who has been called to rescue many a tour or recording session.

  • Advice

    Fear of Singing

    "When working with new clients, I always begin by trying to ascertain what it is about their voices that they perceive as problematic or would like to improve."

  • Advice

    Creating Your Commercial Demo

    There are as many types of voiceover demo, but usually, when people ask if you have a voiceover demo, they really mean a commercial voiceover demo.

  • Advice

    Singing With Mr. Darcy

    A tall, good-looking lad—he wouldn't have been playing Mr. Darcy if he weren't—Doug Carpenter more than once refers to singing as his passion.

  • Advice

    Modern Melismas and More

    In contemporary styles such as pop, R&B, and jazz, vocal improvisation is a vital component of an exciting performance. But many well-trained singers can freeze up when asked to improvise.

  • Advice

    Angela Michael Teaches Others How to Maximize Their Vocal Palette

    Singers attempting to enter the professional ranks often find that being gifted and well-trained is not enough. They need to develop a range of vocal sounds, textures, and colors to meet every musical situation.

  • Advice

    Nancy Reardon's Advice for Reporters and Hosts is Useful for Actors Too

    The voice has everything to do with "personality." She says, "The voice is so important—and not a shrill voice. A low voice. Think of the voices you love. They're all low."