Theater: Plays

Production: 'A Cuckold' (See all 8 roles)

Narrator (Lead)

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Production Details

Casting a staged reading of "A Cuckold," an original 80-minute play written by Zen Anton through the Downtown Art's Writers Project. The play is a comic film noir take on domestic ...more

Get more details on 'A Cuckold', including pay, union details, full description, rehearsal & production dates & locations, script sides, other roles, and more.

Seeking

Male, ages 25-45, All Ethnicities

Role Description

Narrator: (Lead) is fed up with narrating Mountain's dull existence. Thus, when an opportunity to make Mountain's life more interesting arises, Narrator leaps for its jugular with arms out stretched.

Auditions

Seeking submissions from: New York, NY Sign up or Log In to apply.

Scene 1: Narrator and Mountain

Scene 1
(Lights come up revealing a man at a kitchen table. He holds a fork with a pair of boxer-briefs dangling on top.)

NARRATOR
He blamed his mother. He blamed his mother for most things. But what he blamed his mother for most of all was his name: Mountain.

(MOUNTAIN lets out a sigh.)

Mountain was a small child. With this in mind, you can see why his name bothered him. Even now he can still hear those schoolyard taunts.

(MOUNTAIN puts down the fork.)

He used to draw pictures of his classmates as dismembered bodies. Once his parents found out, Mountain explained that the source of his miserable life was his name. Since he was 7, they didn’t take him seriously and merely threw away his red crayons so he’d stop drawing so much blood.

(MOUNTAIN picks up the fork.)

He also felt that his name evoked the necessity to become someone who enjoyed yoga and who was referred to by his friends as, “Outdoorsy.” Someone who had a prominent jaw line and a steely, yet not unkind, glint in his eyes. Someone who rejected society’s constructs of education and traveled the world gaining a PHD in life. Someone who read Rumi to women who spoke Spanish with French accents while lying together in hammocks. Someone who kissed like a grandma and made love like a 25-year-old man. Someone who wakes up in the middle of the night, seized with a profound feeling of spirituality, and goes to gaze at the sky wondering what it all means and what comes after. (Beat.) He blamed his mother. He blamed his mother for—

MOUNTAIN
You said that already.

NARRATOR
Well, I’m waiting for you to make up your mind. (NARRATOR turns back to audience.) During his late teens, while attempting to read an issue of GQ, he came across the word “stoic." After reading the description, he decided all the things he was destined to become could be correlated back to that word. So, he tried being stoic. He stopped being stoic upon realizing his silence was due to having nothing interesting to say, rather than being engaged in deep thinking.

(MOUNTAIN gets up and walks around the table.)

A week of intense depression followed until Mountain was hit with a second revelation: he hated the wilderness, was not limber enough for yoga, thought hammocks were uncomfortable, found Rumi rather depressing and was not concerned with the afterlife as it had no relevance to the present. It was around this time that his hatred towards hippies blossomed.

(MOUNTAIN sits back down.)

MOUNTAIN
You know, it could be a gift.

NARRATOR
You know, normally gifts come with tags. (NARRATOR turns to audience.) Mountain spent his early twenties without wild partying. Instead he chose to study wildly.

MOUNTAIN
They’re pink.

NARRATOR
He studied so much that he feels he missed the point in life that most people look nostalgically back on while plucking out grey hairs.

(MOUNTAIN inspects the underwear.)

MOUNTAIN
The tag says, “Wicking.” But the word in front is faded. What is, “wicking?"

NARRATOR
He is now 35. Still young. Or at least arguably so.

MOUNTAIN
Maybe they belong to Chelsea’s brother?

NARRATOR
What would her brother’s underwear be doing on your kitchen table?

MOUNTAIN
John has always been a slob. Didn’t he stay over last week?

NARRATOR
John stayed over two weeks again.


MOUNTAIN
Maybe they’re mine and I forgot I bought them?

NARRATOR
You would never wear boxer briefs.

MOUNTAIN
Maybe they fell through the window from a clothesline?

NARRATOR
Who in this day and age hangs laundry from a clothesline?

MOUNTAIN
Maybe Chelsea mixed them up with someone else’s laundry.
(MOUNTAIN twirls the underwear on his fork.)

NARRATOR
The undergarments’ rapid rotation reminded Mountain of his attempt to teach surly seventh graders how planets orbit. They had been on a class camping trip. His students hadn’t listened to a word Mountain said. Mountain was used to this type of treatment.

MOUNTAIN
Maybe one of Chelsea’s friends got caught in the rain and had to come up to change clothes because of a work appointment and—

NARRATOR
You’re grasping at straws. (NARRATOR speaks to audience.) Mountain had not longed to become a science teacher. Instead, the course of his life had lethargically wound its way in that general direction - much like the drop of condensation that trickles down a glass of water and no one remembers to wipe.

MOUNTAIN
If they’re not John’s, why are they here?

NARRATOR
Maybe...

MOUNTAIN
Maybe what?


NARRATOR
Maybe with you gone, Chelsea... nothing. You don’t take my advice anyway.

MOUNTAIN
Chelsea what?

NARRATOR
Maybe with you gone, for two whole days, Chelsea became lonely.

MOUNTAIN
And?

NARRATOR
And desired some, “company.”

MOUNTAIN
She would never.

NARRATOR
You were awfully hasty to jump to that never.

MOUNTAIN
She was away.

NARRATOR
Who says Chelsea was away?

MOUNTAIN
She did.

NARRATOR
Ah.

MOUNTAIN
She was at her father’s. We’re meeting tonight for Samantha’s birthday.

NARRATOR
What if she came home early?

MOUNTAIN
And not tell me?

NARRATOR
That’s what you did.

MOUNTAIN
The field trip ended early. No reason to not come home.

NARRATOR
Either way, you came back early without letting her know. Made me think you were worried about something.

MOUNTAIN
What would I have to be worried about?

NARRATOR
Didn’t I already tell you?

MOUNTAIN
Chelsea would never.

NARRATOR
Never say never.

MOUNTAIN
She was away.

NARRATOR
I’m getting dizzy from these circles. (Beat.) Anger began to lick at the edges of Mountain’s thoughts

MOUNTAIN
She would never.
(MOUNTAIN rapidly gets up and puts the underwear in his pocket.)

NARRATOR
Where are you going?

MOUNTAIN
To get a present.

NARRATOR
For?

MOUNTAIN
For Samantha’s birthday party.


NARRATOR
I forgot. (MOUNTAIN exits.) As Mountain left, his inner fury escaped and he shut the door with such a force that it shook down to the very hinges of hell.
(The door shuts very quietly.)