Interview

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  • Interview

    'Mad' About Them

    Jon Hamm and John Slattery were journeyman actors, having trod the boards and made countless guest appearances on TV series.  Then a basic-cable show called "Mad Men" changed their careers and lives.

  • Interview

    From the Ground Up

    Jennifer Cetrone was a working actor, landing roles on TV and a few films, and performing regularly with East L.A. Classic Theatre.

  • Interview

    From Sir with Love

    Currently one of the great living legends of British acting, knighted for his service in 1997, Donald Sinden is not shy about telling firsthand tales of actors he has admired.

  • Interview

    A 'Basterd' Unlike Any Other

    As a German-born actor raised in Ireland, Michael Fassbender originally had dreams of becoming a lead guitarist in a heavy metal band. However, he quickly realized it wasn't the right path for him.

  • Interview

    Not 'Slipping'

    Daniel Talbott planned to be an actor and director. The desire to write plays came long after high school, when he read the late British playwright Sarah Kane's "Blasted," a bleak and violent piece scripted when she was 23.

  • Interview

    She's on Fire   

    The absence of artifice also informs Charlyne Yi's bracingly unaffected stage presence—but the resulting comedy is about as far from mainstream as you can get.

  • Interview

    'You Got the Part'

    Chris Messina shares that auditions are not usually his strong suit. "I'm scared when people go, 'I love auditioning.' I hate it. I'm bad at it," he admits.

  • Interview

    And Now for Something Completely Different

    Ansari has become one of the most prolific writers and performers on the comedy scene in recent years, despite being only 26. The American Indian made his mark at New York's Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre and won a standup award at the Aspen Comedy Festival in 2006.

  • Interview

    Facing the Truth

    Hugh Dancy has no choice but to agree when it's pointed out to him that he has thus far made a career of playing lucky, confident, blithe men in beautiful period pieces.

  • Interview

    Schmooze Alarm

    If anyone has proved the Woody Allen maxim that "80 percent of success is showing up," it's actor-producer Dan Griffin. In 1995, he went to the set of the TV series "Central Park West" for three days straight, hoping to land a background role.