Interview

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  • Interview

    See for Yourself

    Want to check out the great performances of another era—either to see how far we've come or measure how far we've fallen? Here's a list of revival houses, organizations, businesses, and other resources that cater to film buffs and other students of the screen art.

  • Interview

    Stars of Yesteryear

    I spent my earliest years in little Nebraska towns that could not be classified as hotbeds of culture. Not that the people were stupid, unenlightened, or unintelligent, not that they were uneducated, but their intellectual and cultural resources were, to say the least, limited.

  • Interview

    The Nicholas Brothers

    For me the dancing Nicholas Brothers always seemed to be the spice in the broth of 1940s movie musicals, the cherry on Fred Astaire's smooth frosting, the piquancy in Gene Kelly's homey stews.

  • Interview

    Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet

    Like the Laurel and Hardy of crime, the unlikely but popular duo of Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre made an unofficial series of Warner Bros. films during the 1940s, often wartime thrillers in which they schemed with or against each other.

  • Interview

    Kim Hunter

    Has anyone encapsulated quiet suffering more memorably than Kim Hunter? For the 1951 film version of A Streetcar Named Desire, Hunter snagged an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress and embedded herself in the lexicon as the "Stella!" to Marlon Brando's Stanley Kowalski.

  • Interview

    Mabel Normand

    To cross genres and eras a bit, imagine the impish, doe-eyed beauty of Audrey Tautou in Amélie, mixed with the strong-willed zaniness of Lucille Ball, that constant catalyst for chaos.

  • Interview

    Two-Part Harmony

    Lily Tomlin and Jane Wagner's unique artistic collaboration is founded on never giving up the search.

  • Interview

    Two For One

    SAG president Melissa Gilbert and AFTRA president John Connolly make the case for consolidation.

  • Interview

    An Open Brooks

    At the start of the musical The Producers, the audience meets Max Bialystock, a once great hit maker who is now only a legend in his own mind. Dubbing himself "the king of Broadway," Bialystock fondly remembers a time when "everything I touched would turn to gold." Now reduced to ...

  • Interview

    What's Up With... Fyvush Finkel

    Who he is: An Emmy- and Obie-winning actor, Fyvush Finkel began his career at the age of 9 performing in Jewish theatres in New York City. He currently portrays outspoken teacher Harvey Lipschultz on David E. Kelley's high school drama Boston Public.