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    Denver, Primus Announce New Prize

    The Denver Center Theatre Company and the Francesca Ronnie Primus Foundation have announced a new playwrighting prize. Called the Francesca Primus Prize, after the late theatre critic and Back Stage columnist, the honor will carry a $3,000 cash award for the winning

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    FACE TO FACE: Alfred Uhry - After the "Ballyhoo"‹Comes the "Parade"

    Playwright Alfred Uhry suggests there's an irreconcilable gap between being Southern and being Jewish. "If you're a Southerner you're a Southerner for the rest of your life, whether or not you're living in the South anymore. In fact, southern Jews define themselves as Southern first, American ...

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    Elton Revisits Revised "Aida' Composer Lauds Show 10 Days After Hissy-Fit Walkout

    Elton John returned to the Palace Theatre last Thursday to re-preview his new Broadway musical "Aida" and declared the production, which is scheduled to open March 23, "an 11 on a scale of one to 10." This was only 10 days after the composer, who collaborated on "Aida" with lyricist ...

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    SAG-AFTRA Panel Set to Fight Ageism

    One of the more insidious aspects of discrimination is the way it frequently makes victims feel, or come to feel, that it's inevitable. People who face increasingly common incidents of ageism may feel embarrassed and, even worse, helpless. But they don't have

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    British Stages Face Internet Ticket Ban

    (The Stage) LONDON-Scores of British venues face being banned from selling their tickets on the Internet because their banks say they cannot be trusted to cover the potential cost of transactions.

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    Welcome to Chelsea

    "Welcome to Chelsea" runs at the Grove Street Playhouse through July 26. The piece, written by and featuring Martin Outzen, tells the story of four men who are drawn into the glamour of Chelsea's gay fast

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    FACE TO FACE: Richard Monette - Bringing Stratford to New York

    What a concept: setting "Much Ado About Nothing" in 1920s Sicily, besotted in naughty art deco and jazz-age merriment. Now add to the mix a couple of near-geriatric crocks (Brian Bedford and Martha Henry) romping about as the romantic leads, traditionally identified with swaggering youth and post-pubescent nubility.