Spotlight

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  • News

    Spotlight on New York Acting Schools and Coaches

    It's that time again for Back Stage's comprehensive spotlight on New York acting schools and coaches. Take advantage of this great resource to hone your abilities and further develop your acting skills.

  • News

    Spotlight On...Dance

    Music relies on the pitches, dynamics, and colors of sounds, as well as lyrics, for characterization. But how is it done in dance?

  • News

    Welcome to New York

    All the inside information you need to live, work, and succeed in the rough and tumble world of New York City.

  • News

    Spotlight on Representation

    So, what's the difference between an agent and manager? The line between agent and manager is blurring. Back Stage helps explain the changes that can affect you.

  • News

    Case for Space

    Finding rehearsal space in New York is a little like finding a place to live in New York. It can be as tough as anything else in the city or it can be one of those "OMG, I can't believe my luck" experiences.

  • News

    Headshots and Marketing Tools

    From weaving a web(site) to saving face on Facebook, Back Stage explores how actors can make the most of their marketing tools and headshots.    

  • News

    The List Issue 2010

    From wise investing to vocal dos and contract don'ts, Back Stage presents "The List Issue," the essential compendium of insider tips and advice from across the acting spectrum.

  • News

    L.A. Acting Markets

    Back Stage presents The Guide to the L.A. Acting Market, with advice, secrets, and stories by L.A. acting professionals about how to make the most of the City of Angels.

  • News

    Actors Casting Directors Love

    This week's issue is a first of its kind: a collection of essays written by or relayed to Back Stage by casting directors from across the country, each sharing a story about a special actor they have auditioned and, in some cases, cast.

  • News

    Keeping Up With Alexander

    After Frederick Matthias Alexander completely lost his voice in the middle of a 1888 performance, he embarked on the prolonged period of self-study out of which emerged his groundbreaking vocal technique.