Reviews

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  • Reviews

    Blood and Thunder

    Terence Anthony's drama is set in the second-floor apartment of a house in New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward during Hurricane Katrina.

  • Reviews

    And the Winner Is...

    When journalist Mitch Albom reconnected with college professor Morrie Schwartz, he found a new career writing books and plays about the meaning of life.

  • Reviews

    Ditch

    Taylor Coffman's play about 20-something relationship angst would be pleasant enough if it just had less on its mind.

  • Reviews

    The Beverly Hills Psychiatrist

    More a skit than a play, the American premiere of this play by Cornelius Schnauber, translated by John Howard and Anne Adams, is exactly what you hoped for, given the play's title.

  • Reviews

    Sunshine Cleaning

    Though the premise is morbid, the quirky Sunshine Cleaning left a bright spot on my mind, thanks to the fine performances by Amy Adams and Emily Blunt as sisters who, despite not seeing eye-to-eye, become business partners in a cut-rate cleaning service that caters to tidying up after bloody accidents ...

  • Reviews

    State of Play

    When Brad Pitt drops out of a major motion picture just four days before production is set to begin, it could be a complete disaster. But in the case of State of Play, it turned out to be a blessing — mainly because replacement star Russell Crowe has turned in his ...

  • Reviews

    An Englishman in New York

    A sequel to 1975's The Naked Civil Servant, this film once again stars John Hurt as gay pioneer Quentin Crisp. An Englishman in New York documents Crisp's fluctuating fortunes after he moved from Britain to New York City soon after the first film (and the book it was ...

  • Reviews

    Is He Dead?

    Once you get past the fact that this "new" 1898 play by Mark Twain is receiving its West Coast premiere 111 years after it was written, its tale of the European art scene circa the mid-19th century is quite strikingly contemporary.

  • Reviews

    Offices

    Even though it clocks in at a mere 75 minutes, Ethan Coen's latest collection of one-acts wears out its welcome long before it's over, mistaking as it does banality for hipness.

  • Reviews

    Management

    "I'm sorry. Sweet just doesn't cut it," Jennifer Aniston's character, Sue Claussen, tells defeated suitor Mike Cranshaw, played by Steve Zahn. That sums up this so-so romantic comedy, which, while sweet, doesn't cut it in the romance and comedy departments.