Reviews

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  • Reviews

    Loose Screws

    Andrea Wolff shows some stage presence and vocal prowess in this bawdy one-woman show, but whether it works for you may depend on your tolerance for penis jokes.

  • Reviews

    Here at Home

    This experimental piece is a full-blown digital barrage, using projections and sound to bring the horrors of war to the home front.

  • Reviews

    Knickerbocker

    A play consisting of nothing but two-person conversations in the same restaurant booth could be static, but this is a moving and funny rumination on fatherhood.

  • Reviews

    Through the Night

    An original yet recognizable community in contemporary Harlem comes blazingly alive in this one-person but multicharacter show by writer-performer Daniel Beaty.

  • Reviews

    The Kid

    Musicalizing sex columnist Dan Savage's 1999 book about adopting a child with his boyfriend might seem an unpromising idea, but the New Group's "The Kid" quickly persuades otherwise.

  • Reviews

    Love, Loss and What I Wore

    Regardless of who wrote what, there's a healthy dose of humor mixed with a few touching tales, delivered with energy and honesty by a talented veteran cast.

  • Reviews

    Ensemble Studio Theatre Marathon 2010, Series A

    "Where the Children Are," the final work in Series A of Ensemble Studio Theatre's 2010 marathon of one-act plays, delivers emotional clout and makes up for the lackluster quartet that precedes it. 

  • Reviews

    The Maids

    Jean Genet's play about maids who murdered their employer and her daughter dives to creepy depths with the help of director Arminca LaManna and actors fully immersed inside a twisted, waking nightmare.

  • Reviews

    Prophecy

    Karen Malpede crams in every major international crisis of the past 70 years in this political melodrama. Fortunately, Kathleen Chalfant illuminates the convoluted plot.

  • Reviews

    THE BOOK OF CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS

    French poet and playwright Paul Claudel's ponderous 1930 drama about the life of Christopher Columbus uses its biographical subject matter to frame a rather dry meditation on wanderlust, as well as the notion that even when God touches someone's life with brilliance, it's just for a moment ...