Reviews

Sort by:

  • Reviews

    THE MAIDS

    Deciding to launch a theatrical production company with a play by Jean Genet must presage some kind of artistic death wish, second only to casting oneself as Hamlet. Luckily the brave souls who present this mounting of a remarkably difficult classic are well up to the task. Led by director ...

  • Reviews

    THE EYES OF BABYLON

    What Jeff Key has done with his remarkable one-person memoir is to reinvent what it means to be an American hero. Deployed as a U.S. serviceman to uphold what is called "Operation Iraqi Freedom," Key journalized the experience of encountering a valiant people living their lives surrounded by a ...

  • Reviews

    Scout's Honor

    Claudia Jaffee, director of West Coast Ensemble's To Kill a Mockingbird, is out on the sidewalk in front of the theatre one recent hot Sunday afternoon, taking a break from auditioning actors. Standing under the theatre's awning, she is deep in conversation with her producer about how best ...

  • Reviews

    Otello

    The performers here are quite operatic in voice, some more marvelously than others. But modern audiences increasingly expect a little acting with their opera.

  • Reviews

    Assassins

    Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman's 1990 musical about the role of presidential assassins in American society is a virtual tabula rasa for any director.

  • Reviews

    The Chocolate Soldier in Concert

    Presented by Musicals Tonight!, casting by Stephen DeAngelis, at the 45th Street Theatre, 354 W. 45 St., NYC, March 29–April 10.

  • Reviews

    Rose's Dilemma

    Neil Simon has created a sadly flat excursion into the lives and afterlives of fairly unexceptional people in this 2003 play.

  • Reviews

    Endgame

    Director Andrei Belgrader and his expert company remember that these figures are tragic clowns, almost Chaplinesque, and give the new production the air of a nightmarish circus.

  • Reviews

    Improbable Frequency

    Improbable Frequencyis absolute entertainment. Although it's nominally about code-cracking in neutral Ireland in 1941, it's a silly theatrical romp.

  • Reviews

    Dr. Faustus

    Despite a compelling, knowing, and committed performance by Daniel Wolfe in the title role, Christopher Marlowe's play is largely ill-served by director Richard Mazda's frequently overwrought and grab-bag production.