Reviews

Sort by:

  • Reviews

    An Englishman in New York

    A sequel to 1975's The Naked Civil Servant, this film once again stars John Hurt as gay pioneer Quentin Crisp. An Englishman in New York documents Crisp's fluctuating fortunes after he moved from Britain to New York City soon after the first film (and the book it was ...

  • Reviews

    The Soloist

    Like the ethereal Beethoven heard in the film, the lead performances by Jamie Foxx as a homeless musician and Robert Downey Jr. as a newspaper columnist who takes an interest in the musician's plight are sublime.

  • Reviews

    Is He Dead?

    Once you get past the fact that this "new" 1898 play by Mark Twain is receiving its West Coast premiere 111 years after it was written, its tale of the European art scene circa the mid-19th century is quite strikingly contemporary.

  • Reviews

    Offices

    Even though it clocks in at a mere 75 minutes, Ethan Coen's latest collection of one-acts wears out its welcome long before it's over, mistaking as it does banality for hipness.

  • Reviews

    Management

    "I'm sorry. Sweet just doesn't cut it," Jennifer Aniston's character, Sue Claussen, tells defeated suitor Mike Cranshaw, played by Steve Zahn. That sums up this so-so romantic comedy, which, while sweet, doesn't cut it in the romance and comedy departments.

  • Reviews

    The Brothers Bloom

    'The Brothers Bloom' is a blooming wonderful little flick.

  • Reviews

    Collected Stories

    Donald Margulies' two-hander applies the dynamic seen in 'All About Eve' to the literary world—in this case legendary short-story author Ruth Steiner (Kandis Chappell) and young up-and-comer Lisa Morrison (Melanie Lora).

  • Reviews

    Eve's Rapture

    It's difficult to tell where, exactly, the playwright wants to take us in 'Eve's Rapture'. For the most part it feels uncomfortably like stylish Christian doctrine.

  • Reviews

    The Temperamentals

    Gay artists are reclaiming their history. Like "Milk," Jon Marans has done something similar for Harry Hay in his bright and affecting new play, "The Temperamentals."

  • Reviews

    Pound

    Ezra Pound, the influential American poet accused of treason during World War II but never tried, finally gets his chance for a jury verdict in "Pound," written and directed by William Roetzheim.