Reviews

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    Carved in Stone

    This loony, crazy quilt of a play by late gay playwright Jeffrey Hartgraves is set in a strange sort of limbo where a group of gay writers and icons have taken up residence.

  • Reviews

    Darling

    The most memorable moments in "Darling," the new dance-theatre piece by choreographer Sam Kim, are the many entrances and exits of its four dancers.

  • Reviews

    Death in Love

    "Death in Love" is an original and fascinating film that is nonetheless difficult to watch. Sections are repellent, some might say pornographic.

  • Reviews

    The Boxer

    Unless you need further proof that silence usually isn't golden in live theater, better to rerun a favorite silent movie whose artistry transcends its mechanics.

  • Reviews

    Greendale, G.P.

    This day-in-the-life drama about doctors in small-town Ohio isn't compelling enough but does offer some good performances and observant writing.

  • Reviews

    The Seagull

    If we'd never tried to move culture along, we'd still be living in caves. All trying is worth the effort. But not all trying leads to the optimal results.

  • Reviews

    Putting It Together

    As a black-tie party in a Manhattan skyscraper progresses and everyone drinks a little too much, intimate secrets emerge as the characters confront their lives and ambitions.

  • Reviews

    A Piece of My Heart

    Presented by Girl Next Door Productions as part of the New York International Fringe Festival at the Kraine Theatre, 85 E. Fourth St., NYC, Aug. 10-18.

  • Reviews

    FUNNY, YOU DON'T LOOK LIKE A GRANDMOTHER

    Granny gets the glory here at Santa Monica Playhouse, which simultaneously celebrates grandma and its 37th year. They don't look their ages. This ingratiating little revue is adapted from the book of the same name by Lois Wyse, prolific author, editor, marketing expert/ad exec who created that immortal ...

  • Reviews

    Harm's Way

    It's a grim, eloquent, tautly written play, skillfully directed by Steve Zuckerman on a bleak, all-gray set. Stehlin richly captures the grief and gravitas of a career officer who must face the fact that his personal hell has become enmeshed with the hell of war.