Reviews

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  • Reviews

    Death in Love

    "Death in Love" is an original and fascinating film that is nonetheless difficult to watch. Sections are repellent, some might say pornographic.

  • Reviews

    Putting It Together

    As a black-tie party in a Manhattan skyscraper progresses and everyone drinks a little too much, intimate secrets emerge as the characters confront their lives and ambitions.

  • Reviews

    J. Edgar

    Ambitious, controversial, speculative, engaging, and sometimes frustrating, Clint Eastwood's "J. Edgar" is a worthy, if at times uneven, attempt to encapsulate the life of the man who ruled the FBI for nearly 50 years.

  • Reviews

    Anonymous

    Screenwriter John Orloff tried to get his story about a fraudulent Shakespeare on the screen for 15 years, but that other movie (yes, "Shakespeare in Love") stood in the way.

  • Reviews

    Rabbit Hole

    Screenwriter David Lindsay-Abaire's celluloid version of his play "Rabbit Hole," brilliantly directed by John Cameron Mitchell, offers a surprisingly fresh take on the writer's compelling drama, punctuated with wry humor.

  • Reviews

    A Better Life

    Carlos dreams of a better future for himself and his teenage son, Luis, who is finding himself pulled increasingly closer into gang activity as he distances himself from his father.

  • Reviews

    Love & Sex in the Earth's Spin Cycle

    One of the keys to successful dating, explains writer-performer Lambeth Sterling, is to look for "the less fucked."

  • Reviews

    Henry V

    Watching the magnetic energy and smart staging brought to this rendering of Shakespeare's buoyant history is like being courtside at a great basketball game—and there's great language to boot.

  • Reviews

    State of Play

    When Brad Pitt drops out of a major motion picture just four days before production is set to begin, it could be a complete disaster. But in the case of State of Play, it turned out to be a blessing — mainly because replacement star Russell Crowe has turned in his ...

  • Reviews

    Management

    "I'm sorry. Sweet just doesn't cut it," Jennifer Aniston's character, Sue Claussen, tells defeated suitor Mike Cranshaw, played by Steve Zahn. That sums up this so-so romantic comedy, which, while sweet, doesn't cut it in the romance and comedy departments.