Dance Review

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  • Reviews

    Richmond Ballet: Program A

    A versatile 17-member company, Virginia's Richmond Ballet opened its one-week season at the Joyce Theater with a vibrantly danced evening (Program A) of three fine contemporary ballets.

  • Reviews

    Transcending Form

    Choreographer John Byrne's ambitious contemporary dance fable purports to express the idea of the transcending soul but doesn't find compelling ways to physically illustrate its weighty ideas.

  • Reviews

    New York City Ballet

    For its first-ever fall season at Lincoln Center, New York City Ballet is offering four weeks of mixed bills that are giving audiences a chance to catch up with some of the new ballets.

  • Reviews

    Paul Taylor Dance Company

    Paul Taylor Dance Company proffered an uneven triple bill that sandwiched off-putting "Brief Encounters" between enchanting "Black Tuesday" and uncomfortable "Arden Court."

  • Reviews

    Allemande

    Josh Beamish is a Canadian dance artist whose work deserves much greater and more widespread recognition in the U.S. than it has yet received.

  • Reviews

    360 Degree Dance Company

    Alessandra Prosperi and company artistic director Martin Løfsnes are exhilarating dancers, but unfortunately their choreography fails to reach the same high level of accomplishment.

  • Reviews

    Charlie's Angels

    The show has nothing to do with the popular television series; the Charlie in this case is revolutionary jazz saxophonist Charlie Parker.

  • Reviews

    Pilobolus

    The company, known for its imaginatively gymnastic, codependent group body configurations, is in top form, offering a sparkling array of physically wowing and theatrically tickling works.

  • Reviews

    Bacchae

    A world premiere choreographed by Luca Veggetti, this engrossingly experimental work combines a bit of puppetry, slippery text, flute and electronic sounds, and gorgeous contemporary dance.

  • Reviews

    Romeo and Juliet

    This "Romeo and Juliet" is the real deal. Even if you just saw New York City Ballet's hideous "Romeo + Juliet" this spring—or caught it on PBS in May—you'll want to revisit Shakespeare's tragic love story at American Ballet Theatre.