LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    A Good Smoke

    I couldn't help but feel that Don Cumming's self-directed piece was simply a faster, more accessible version ofLong Day's Journey Into Night.

  • Reviews

    Closer

    Patrick Marber's incisive, dramatically piercing, savagely funny 1997 script has been described as "a sexual square dance" of four characters who repeatedly change romantic partners¿a process aided by a complex structure that moves back and forth through time.

  • Reviews

    Sister Cities

    This two-act drama of four estranged sisters-with different personalities, lifestyles, and fathers, reunited by the suicide of their terminally ill mother-was conceived and written by Circus Theatricals company member Colette Freedman.

  • Reviews

    The Crumple Zone

    A smart blend of the conventions of witty sex comedy with poignant reflections on longing and loneliness in gay relationships.

  • Reviews

    The Submission and The Future Is in Eggs

    Ionesco and Astroturf--what a happy thing. In mounting two of Eugène Ionesco's lesser-known (and pre-Rhinoceros) works, Zoo District's Kristi Webber and a top-notch cast have given an old absurdist a new, decidedly retro infusion of hipster chic and manic energy.

  • Reviews

    First Monday In October

    In the 1970s, when this play was first produced, it seemed provocatively hip to place a woman on the Supreme Court bench and have her hail from the bastion of well-to-do conservatism, Orange County.

  • Reviews

    The Women

    I went with the hope of expunging the memory of the recent cinematic remake of Clare Boothe Luce's sharply observed look at life among women of means.

  • Reviews

    'Nami

    Playwright Chad Beckim's piece on the sale of children in the sex-slave market builds with genuine tension but reaches a gory climax that is arbitrary and strains credulity.

  • Reviews

    Reefer Madness, The Musical

    Based on the Z-grade 1936 morality film warning parents of the dangers of "the leafy green assassin," Kevin Murphy and Dan Studney's musical version, which opened Off-Broadway in 2001, is an absolute hoot.

  • Reviews

    Back to Babylon

    In this self-crafted solo show, Gregg Tomé starts and ends as a man who refuses to attend his 10-year high school reunion but then spends his increasingly inebriated evening recalling many of his friends.