LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Steal Away: The Living History of Harriet Tubman

    The play unfolds Tubman's memories, sweetly showing that there are good and bad people no matter our race or gender. But Balian's direction lacks an imagination.

  • Reviews

    Langston & Nicolas

    Writing a marathon-length historical play that leaves audiences caring about once-breathing people is a difficult task, but Bernardo Solano has succeeded superbly in his sweeping epic

  • Reviews

    Something Happened

    It has been six years since L. Trey Wilson impressed critics with "Stage Directions," and his latest effort should add to his reputation as a playwright capable of blending genuine comedy with deep universal social issues.

  • Reviews

    Love, Loss and What I Wore

    Regardless of who wrote what, there's a healthy dose of humor mixed with a few touching tales, delivered with energy and honesty by a talented veteran cast.

  • Reviews

    The Maids

    Jean Genet's play about maids who murdered their employer and her daughter dives to creepy depths with the help of director Arminca LaManna and actors fully immersed inside a twisted, waking nightmare.

  • Reviews

    Into The Woods

    Emblematic of ongoing human suffering throughout history, this Stephen Sondheim musical is as relevant today as the timeless fairy tales on which it is based.

  • Reviews

    Gulliver's Travels

    This 'Gulliver's Travels' is firing on all cylinders. Josh Zeller's sharp adaptation, the creative multimedia effects, and the fun costumes; P. Adam Walsh's snappy direction; and a remarkably versatile cast, headed by Keythe Farley, are ideal.

  • Reviews

    The Immigrant

    This handsome and enjoyable production packs an emotional punch.

  • Reviews

    The Underpants

    Comedy is sticky-wicket business. It gets even trickier when 100 years pass and translation is involved.

  • Reviews

    The Value of Names

    Playwright Sweet is far too experienced to opt for easy answers, reminding us that in one of America's darkest hours, the line between villain and victim could be entertainingly murky.