LA Theater Review

Sort by:

  • Reviews

    Back to Babylon

    In this self-crafted solo show, Gregg Tomé starts and ends as a man who refuses to attend his 10-year high school reunion but then spends his increasingly inebriated evening recalling many of his friends.

  • Reviews

    'Nami

    Playwright Chad Beckim's piece on the sale of children in the sex-slave market builds with genuine tension but reaches a gory climax that is arbitrary and strains credulity.

  • Reviews

    Gaslight

    Though the 1944 George Cukor film version is generally considered a classic, this long-winded tale of extreme mental cruelty, and worse, hasn't aged well.

  • Reviews

    St. Joan and the Dancing Sickness

    Somewhere in rural Louisiana in 1999, a community is forced to face up to the cruelty and corruption of its state government.

  • Reviews

    Never Land

    In writer-director Phyllis Nagy’s unnerving 1998 tragicomedy the playwright explores ennui and tensions emanating from European class and cultural differences and within family relationships.

  • Reviews

    Jackson Frost

    All of the performances were so exquisitely alive, the arts of listening and unselfconscious participation so in full use, that this had to be one of those heightened evenings that result from offstage exigencies.

  • Reviews

    How I Ruined Everything

    Presented by and at Eclectic Company Theatre, 5312 Laurel Canyon Blvd., North Hollywood. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m. Jan. 13-Feb. 18. (818) 508-3003.

  • Reviews

    The Awakening

    ¿We need a new attitude,¿ says Joshua (Derek Shaun), a young, black college grad who returns to his roots, his tough hood, to set up business and try to make a difference. This is in contrast to his best friend, John (Damon Christopher), a young black dentist who moves out ...

  • Reviews

    Feed

    Structurally speaking, what is more inherently dramatic than an old-fashioned courtroom drama? And if you've got a clever playwright who can give audiences the old rhetorical one-two punch, all the better.

  • Reviews

    Quarterlife

    Talk about strange bedfellows: The envelope-pushing Rude Guerrilla Theater Company tackles a classic 1965 musical.