LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Merrily We Roll Along

    Gary Romm's efficient direction keeps 'Merrily's' action lively and the running time at just under three hours, but there's little that can be done about the book, which even the most effective acting can't overcome.

  • Reviews

    Sometimes I Cry

    Sheryl Lee Ralph's powerful one-woman show about women infected and affected by AIDS makes you pay attention.

  • Reviews

    Can-Can

    Writer-director David Lee, a master at revitalizing seldom-revived musicals, outdoes himself in his spectacular take on Cole Porter's vintage 1953 tuner.

  • Reviews

    Better Than Beethoven

    Ultimately, Bassan's script is an eclectic grab bag that combines too many unlikely ingredients, but Brian Murphy's able music direction handily bridges the gaps.

  • Reviews

    Dusk

    McLindon's play is full of effective, if overly familiar, scenes, but his focus seems scattered, uncertain which of his characters is the crux of the story.

  • Reviews

    Frozen

    The Weltanschauung of British playwright Bryony Lavery's 2004 drama is that of a cold, dark place where humans are reduced to creatures of instinct rather than enlightenment.

  • Reviews

    The Boarding House

    About 20 minutes into Ann Noble's play, a character suddenly starts taking Jerry Lewis-type pratfalls all over the stage.

  • Reviews

    The Women of Lockerbie

    On paper, Deborah Brevoort's fictionalized account of Scottish and Americans affected by the terrorist bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 might seem unremarkable. But in the hands of the Actors' Gang and director Brent Hinkley, it's quite the opposite.

  • Reviews

    A Picasso

    His reputation and credentials were not enough to make everyone adore the works of Pablo Picasso. After watching this production, a few more people might become converts to the painter, but others might regard him with the minority view's disdain. We observe the "genius" throw down a few strokes ...

  • Reviews

    Cuts

    Given two items on which to build their 10-minute plays, in this case a pair of scissors and the concept of duplicity, the Dog Ear Playwrights have compiled an octet of one-acts ranging from the sublimely realistic to the absurdly surreal. Threaded together by well-executed scene changes and composer┬┐multimedia ...