LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    In the Heart of America

    How many ways are there to say "war is hell"? Naomi Wallace, by taking on the last few conflagrations, comes up with a plethora of suggestions.

  • Reviews

    Mercury Fur

    The U.S. premiere of British playwright Philip Ridley's 2005 shocker unfolds like a muted nightmare set in a vaguely defined near-future time when lawlessness is the order of the day. Two

  • Reviews

    Rose's Dilemma

    Neil Simon has created a sadly flat excursion into the lives and afterlives of fairly unexceptional people in this 2003 play.

  • Reviews

    Ineffable

    They pull the entire audience onstage for a group photo, they pratfall, they execute stylized choreography to witty musical choices, and yet the show is over too soon.

  • Reviews

    Steal Away: The Living History of Harriet Tubman

    The play unfolds Tubman's memories, sweetly showing that there are good and bad people no matter our race or gender. But Balian's direction lacks an imagination.

  • Reviews

    Harm's Way

    It's a grim, eloquent, tautly written play, skillfully directed by Steve Zuckerman on a bleak, all-gray set. Stehlin richly captures the grief and gravitas of a career officer who must face the fact that his personal hell has become enmeshed with the hell of war.

  • Reviews

    Sammy Skunk's Hollywood Holiday

    I am not one to show up at children¿s theatre, as a rule. I find the character development weak and the plot points forced. However, I was fortunate enough to be able to cajole a 4-year-old of my acquaintance to leave her game of Pretty Pretty Princess for an ...

  • Reviews

    Open Window

    "Open Window," presented by Deaf West Theatre in association with and at Pasadena Playhouse, 39 S. El Molino Ave., Pasadena. Tue.-Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 5 & 9 p.m., Sun. 2 & 7 p.m. (Also Wed. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 2; 2 p.m. Nov. 9.) Oct. 21-Nov. 20. $37-53. (626) 356-7529.

  • Reviews

    The Dinner Party

    Into a private dining room of an upscale Parisian restaurant iconic playwright Neil Simon inserts three divorced couples supposedly invited by a nonappearing host.

  • Reviews

    Death Of A Salesman

    Every mature actor worth his stripes covets the role of Willy Loman, easily the most indelible character of American theatre.