LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Puttin' on the Fritz: Two Cool New Comedies

    These two one-act plays, sub-billed as "Two Cool New Comedies," show definite promise, but "promise" is the key word here.

  • Reviews

    Screwballs

    This is a relatively misbegotten effort, despite the casting of several of L.A.'s finest comedic actors and the presence of a sturdy, detailed, evocative set.

  • Reviews

    The Common Air

    Though it sometimes seems that all solo performances are autobiographical, solipsistic, or both, this piece, written by Alex Lyras and Robert McCaskill and performed by Lyras, reveals a larger ambition and casts a wider net.

  • Reviews

    Innocent When You Dream

    As a lesson in the small acts of kindness and respect, this production is worth seeing. But it's not the best work of the people involved, and in that regard it sadly gets respect but not enough kindness in this review.

  • Reviews

    This Lime Tree Bower

    Like the Coleridge poem of its title, this Conor McPherson work is a tale of escape for the characters and their daily fears. It is also an escape for us, as three young Irishmen welcome us into a new but universally familiar world.

  • Reviews

    Merrily We Roll Along

    Gary Romm's efficient direction keeps 'Merrily's' action lively and the running time at just under three hours, but there's little that can be done about the book, which even the most effective acting can't overcome.

  • Reviews

    Sometimes I Cry

    Sheryl Lee Ralph's powerful one-woman show about women infected and affected by AIDS makes you pay attention.

  • Reviews

    Can-Can

    Writer-director David Lee, a master at revitalizing seldom-revived musicals, outdoes himself in his spectacular take on Cole Porter's vintage 1953 tuner.

  • Reviews

    Better Than Beethoven

    Ultimately, Bassan's script is an eclectic grab bag that combines too many unlikely ingredients, but Brian Murphy's able music direction handily bridges the gaps.

  • Reviews

    Dusk

    McLindon's play is full of effective, if overly familiar, scenes, but his focus seems scattered, uncertain which of his characters is the crux of the story.