LA Theater Review

Sort by:
  • Reviews

    Henry V

    Rarely have Shakespeare's other historical dramas reached the grandeur of this one, the Bard's portrayal of "good King Harry," the Lancastrian monarch who won the Battle of Agincourt.

  • Reviews

    Henry IV, Part I

    The balance of the production is uneven. When Hal and Falstaff are off stage, much of the energy drops.

  • Reviews

    The Taming of the Shrew

    Shakespeare's classic comedy didn't need to be set in the postwar Italy of 1948 to showcase its biggest laughs. But in doing so, director Carl Reggiardo is able to ratchet up the slapstick in this under-the-stars staging.

  • Reviews

    Still Photos

    Elements of this memory play are well-conceived and well-staged. The intertwining of past and present is structured seamlessly, as a grandmother relives her doomed love affair with another woman.

  • Reviews

    Freezing Antarctica

    "Standing on your head, anything is possible-in freezing Antarctica." Bill Sterritt frequently uses this refrain in his quirky play, which he also directs.

  • Reviews

    The Playground

    Few musicals in recent years have been more frustrating than this one. The subject matter-homeless youth-is compelling.

  • Reviews

    Bush Is Bad: Alaska Beauty Queen Edition

    Fair and balanced? Definitely not. Composer and lyricist Joshua Rosenblum puts W. squarely in his sights and unleashes a withering blast of satire in this musical revue.

  • Reviews

    Twist

    The young heroes and heroines of Charles Dickens' novels are invariably subjected to terrible trials and tribulations, but until now nobody ever suggested that the characters enjoyed it.

  • Reviews

    Third

    The late Wasserstein left a legacy of intelligent plays. In this one, her final work, she fashioned a piece that's absorbing -- funny, poignant, and cerebral -- but regrettably bogged down by dramaturgic contrivances that compromise its impact

  • Reviews

    Love & Sex in the Earth's Spin Cycle

    One of the keys to successful dating, explains writer-performer Lambeth Sterling, is to look for "the less fucked."