LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    The Accomplices

    While America was immersed in the lead-up to World War II, Peter Bergson was a sword in the side of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency.

  • Reviews

    Picnic

    Director Michael Ross has found nearly the ideal cast to portray the laconic Midwesterners who populate the Inge landscape.

  • Reviews

    Departures

    There's no escaping memories of the glossyAirportfilm series of the 1970s in this slight ensemble piece, though its disparate story threads play out in an airport terminal rather than in the stratosphere.

  • Reviews

    Brighton Beach Memoirs

    How well this play works depends on how vividly a director and cast can impart the flavor of a struggling Jewish family in Brooklyn circa 1937. Director Darcy Lythgoe's cast fills the bill admirably.

  • Reviews

    Shipwrecked!

    Director Bart DeLorenzo's direction is expansive, allowing for broad humor as well as touching moments. The play is artistic, cohesive, and delightful from start to finish.

  • Reviews

    The Devil Takes a Wife

    Darkly foreboding metaphors don't blend well with giddy showcase shtick in writer-performer Anita Finlay's 75-minute vehicle, a fractured Faustian fable.

  • Reviews

    Assassins

    Stephen Sondheim's darkly comical musical unfortunately retains too much relevance 17 years after its premiere.

  • Reviews

    The Catskill Sonata

    McCarthyism, vodka cocktails, the spirit of Joseph Stalin, and the trials and tribulations of bohemian New Yorkers leaning toward the political left make for a quirky but potent mix in this poignant comedy by Michael Elias (one of the screenwriters of The Jerk).

  • Reviews

    Taken

    This play, by actor Tracy Meeker and director David Serpa, was written as a screenplay, but it works reasonably well on stage. And as a character study of very mixed-up people, it works very well indeed.

  • Reviews

    Strangers on a Subway

    Considering the fertile ground for exploration on subway trains and the obvious relation to the similarly named classic film, one would hope for a richer result than what is offered in this production.