LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    I Never Sang for My Father

    Robert Anderson's classic family drama "I Never Sang for My Father," about a son's longing for a father's love, features an inspirational performance by Philip Baker Hall.

  • Reviews

    bobrauschenbergamerica

    "Art was not a part of lives," says the character known as Bob's Mom in Charles L. Mee's 2001 one-act, nonlinear homage to the late American artist Bob Rauschenberg.

  • Reviews

    The Escort

    In Jane Anderson's highly provocative new play, there are echoes of such works as Mike Nichols' "The Graduate" and a hint of classic French sex farce.

  • Reviews

    Large Cast Energizes '42nd Street' at Musical Theatre West

    Musical Theatre West’s “42nd Street,” the mother of all backstage musicals—and Broadway’s salute to itself and all things musical theater—is lively, kinetic, and jubilant.

  • Reviews

    'Nora' Incisevly Reinvigorates 'A Doll's House'

    Jeanette Driver’s breakout turn brings emotional force to the L.A. debut of “Nora,” Ingmar Bergman’s searing reduction of Ibsen’s “A Doll’s House,” at Pacific Resident Theatre.

  • Reviews

    LA Review: 'Leading Ladies'

    International City Theatre delivers an effervescent, self-assured staging of Ken Ludwig's "Leading Ladies" that makes the most of his genius for farce.

  • Reviews

    'Faith: Part I of a Mexican Trilogy' Completes a Significant Theatrical Achievement

    “Faith: Part I of A Mexican Trilogy,” the first play in Evelina Fernández’s imposing trilogy about a Mexican-American matriarchy, from Latino Theater Company, should not be missed.

  • Reviews

    'The Deep Throat Sex Scandal' Revisits the Swinging '70s

    There is much promise in David Bertolino’s “The Deep Throat Sex Scandal,” at the Zephyr Theatre, but a creatively engorged first act devolves into a flaccid finale.

  • Reviews

    Raised in Captivity

    As dysfunctional families go, the one in "Raised in Captivity," spawning estranged twin nutcases Sebastian and Bernadette, might be one of the most twisted.

  • Reviews

    My Sister In This House

    Through the thoughtfulness of playwright Wendy Kesselman and director Michael Unger, this production ideally suits Deaf West Theatre and its imaginative yet nonintrusive melding of the hearing and nonhearing worlds.