LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Closer

    Patrick Marber's incisive, dramatically piercing, savagely funny 1997 script has been described as "a sexual square dance" of four characters who repeatedly change romantic partners¿a process aided by a complex structure that moves back and forth through time.

  • Reviews

    Sister Cities

    This two-act drama of four estranged sisters-with different personalities, lifestyles, and fathers, reunited by the suicide of their terminally ill mother-was conceived and written by Circus Theatricals company member Colette Freedman.

  • Reviews

    The Crumple Zone

    A smart blend of the conventions of witty sex comedy with poignant reflections on longing and loneliness in gay relationships.

  • Reviews

    The Submission and The Future Is in Eggs

    Ionesco and Astroturf--what a happy thing. In mounting two of Eugène Ionesco's lesser-known (and pre-Rhinoceros) works, Zoo District's Kristi Webber and a top-notch cast have given an old absurdist a new, decidedly retro infusion of hipster chic and manic energy.

  • Reviews

    Stages

    Initially, Abigail Rose Solomon¿sStageswas created as a 90-minute one-act play. But an intermission was added late during the rehearsal process.

  • Reviews

    First Monday In October

    In the 1970s, when this play was first produced, it seemed provocatively hip to place a woman on the Supreme Court bench and have her hail from the bastion of well-to-do conservatism, Orange County.

  • Reviews

    Jackson Frost

    All of the performances were so exquisitely alive, the arts of listening and unselfconscious participation so in full use, that this had to be one of those heightened evenings that result from offstage exigencies.

  • Reviews

    The Taming of the Shrew

    Shakespeare's classic comedy didn't need to be set in the postwar Italy of 1948 to showcase its biggest laughs. But in doing so, director Carl Reggiardo is able to ratchet up the slapstick in this under-the-stars staging.

  • Reviews

    Still Photos

    Elements of this memory play are well-conceived and well-staged. The intertwining of past and present is structured seamlessly, as a grandmother relives her doomed love affair with another woman.

  • Reviews

    Freezing Antarctica

    "Standing on your head, anything is possible-in freezing Antarctica." Bill Sterritt frequently uses this refrain in his quirky play, which he also directs.