LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    The Memorandum

    Presented by Vox Humana at the Pico Playhouse, 10508 W. Pico Blvd., Century City. Thu.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 & 7 p.m. (Dark Sun. 7 p.m. Nov. 20.) Oct. 29-Nov. 20. (323) 769-5794.

  • Reviews

    Shrinks

    "Shrinks," presented by Kevan Jenson for Visualize This in association with Hudson Theatricals at the Hudson Backstage Theatre, 6539 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 7 p.m. Oct. 15-Nov. 20. $15-20. (323) 960-1055.

  • Reviews

    Man Kind (and Unkind)

    "Man Kind (and Unkind)," presented by Interact Theatre Company at the NoHo Arts Center, 11136 Magnolia Blvd., North Hollywood. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. Sep. 23-Oct. 16. $15; 50 for four-play series. (818) 765-8732.

  • Reviews

    Po Boy Tango

    Kenneth Lin's flawed but potentially worthwhile play has three things going for it in its present state: the transcendent performances of Esther Scott, Dennis Dun, and Jeanne Sakata.

  • Reviews

    Crimes of the Heart

    In an intimate theatre, with the cast nearly in your seats, the acting has to be very good, and in this case it is.

  • Reviews

    Puttin' on the Fritz: Two Cool New Comedies

    These two one-act plays, sub-billed as "Two Cool New Comedies," show definite promise, but "promise" is the key word here.

  • Reviews

    Screwballs

    This is a relatively misbegotten effort, despite the casting of several of L.A.'s finest comedic actors and the presence of a sturdy, detailed, evocative set.

  • Reviews

    The Common Air

    Though it sometimes seems that all solo performances are autobiographical, solipsistic, or both, this piece, written by Alex Lyras and Robert McCaskill and performed by Lyras, reveals a larger ambition and casts a wider net.

  • Reviews

    Innocent When You Dream

    As a lesson in the small acts of kindness and respect, this production is worth seeing. But it's not the best work of the people involved, and in that regard it sadly gets respect but not enough kindness in this review.

  • Reviews

    This Lime Tree Bower

    Like the Coleridge poem of its title, this Conor McPherson work is a tale of escape for the characters and their daily fears. It is also an escape for us, as three young Irishmen welcome us into a new but universally familiar world.