LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    The Retreat from Moscow

    As a playwright, William Nicholson specializes in examining family relationships, with a particular focus on husband and wife.

  • Reviews

    What They Have

    This handsome and capably performed world-premiere staging makes an admirable stab at bringing this intelligent yet verbose play to life.

  • Reviews

    Inspecting Carol

    Presented by and at the West Valley Playhouse, 7242 Owensmouth Ave., Canoga Park. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2:30 p.m. (Dark Nov. 24-25.) Nov. 18-Dec. 11. (818) 884-1907.

  • Reviews

    First Monday In October

    In the 1970s, when this play was first produced, it seemed provocatively hip to place a woman on the Supreme Court bench and have her hail from the bastion of well-to-do conservatism, Orange County.

  • Reviews

    Jackson Frost

    All of the performances were so exquisitely alive, the arts of listening and unselfconscious participation so in full use, that this had to be one of those heightened evenings that result from offstage exigencies.

  • Reviews

    The Taming of the Shrew

    Shakespeare's classic comedy didn't need to be set in the postwar Italy of 1948 to showcase its biggest laughs. But in doing so, director Carl Reggiardo is able to ratchet up the slapstick in this under-the-stars staging.

  • Reviews

    Still Photos

    Elements of this memory play are well-conceived and well-staged. The intertwining of past and present is structured seamlessly, as a grandmother relives her doomed love affair with another woman.

  • Reviews

    Freezing Antarctica

    "Standing on your head, anything is possible-in freezing Antarctica." Bill Sterritt frequently uses this refrain in his quirky play, which he also directs.

  • Reviews

    Henry IV, Part I

    The balance of the production is uneven. When Hal and Falstaff are off stage, much of the energy drops.

  • Reviews

    Feed

    Structurally speaking, what is more inherently dramatic than an old-fashioned courtroom drama? And if you've got a clever playwright who can give audiences the old rhetorical one-two punch, all the better.