LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Revisionist History

    Our relationship with history would seem fertile ground for dramatic exploration¿especially if we¿re talking a very particular relationship with specific events of the past. In the case of Bill Sterritt¿s new play, the connection is between two modern-day archeologists¿Nulla and Dig (Barbara Sanders and William Landsman ...

  • Reviews

    Eros & The Guillotine II: Evening A

    When Mickey and Judy came to the bright Technicolor realization that there was a handy barn where they could put on a show, at least they had a plan.

  • Reviews

    Noises Off

    If you're going to like any farce, this is it. That's because Michael Frayn, who also wrote Copenhagen, one of the most intellectually stimulating dramas of the last decade, used the same type of exactitude for this wacky two-and-a-half-hour romp.

  • Reviews

    Talking With

    Estrogen abounds in this revival of Jane Martin's collection of monologues of 11 women on the verge of emotional breakdowns or breakthroughs. The production features well-put-together individualized sets designed by Alejandro Gonzalez, one each for the two clusters of monologues (six in Act I and five in Act II).

  • Reviews

    The Dark Ages

    It could be any back alley in any American downtown, one of those havens for the halt, the lame, the lost, and the scuffed.

  • Reviews

    Mysterious Skin

    The 2003 play by Prince Gomolvilas, like the 2004 film by Gregg Araki, is based on Scott Heim's 1995 novel about two 18-year-olds from a small town in Kansas whose lives took radically different directions after a common experience as Little Leaguers 10 years earlier.

  • Reviews

    Sexual Perversity In Chicago

    There's quite a bit of comedy and fireworks inherent in David Mamet's collection of vignettes that chart the rise and fall of a romantic relationship, as well as male and female attitudes toward sex and the opposite gender.

  • Reviews

    A Bed and a Bar

    Carlos Javier Castillo's shrill battle-of-the-sexes comedy is a protracted sketch billed as a play. Beginning with the first scene, sizable chunks of the two-hour running time involve chauvinistic boors who lewdly expound on their insatiable libidos, brag about their sexual conquests in clinical detail, and categorize women as disposable ...

  • Reviews

    Table Manners

    You know the obligatory applause a "star" gets on his or her first entrance?

  • Reviews

    The Glass Menagerie

    Memory is a tricky gift. So are memory plays. From the start this Tennessee Williams classic lets us know it is a memory play.