LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    The Taming of the Shrew

    Shakespeare's classic comedy didn't need to be set in the postwar Italy of 1948 to showcase its biggest laughs. But in doing so, director Carl Reggiardo is able to ratchet up the slapstick in this under-the-stars staging.

  • Reviews

    Still Photos

    Elements of this memory play are well-conceived and well-staged. The intertwining of past and present is structured seamlessly, as a grandmother relives her doomed love affair with another woman.

  • Reviews

    Freezing Antarctica

    "Standing on your head, anything is possible-in freezing Antarctica." Bill Sterritt frequently uses this refrain in his quirky play, which he also directs.

  • Reviews

    Henry IV, Part I

    The balance of the production is uneven. When Hal and Falstaff are off stage, much of the energy drops.

  • Reviews

    The Women

    I went with the hope of expunging the memory of the recent cinematic remake of Clare Boothe Luce's sharply observed look at life among women of means.

  • Reviews

    St. Alice of Chattahoochee

    It's a rattletrap Alice Johnson has assembled for herself, held together with chewing gum and baling wire for the most part, but, damn, what a driver. Johnson is a lithe, lean gamine with unstoppable energy and mercurial features.

  • Reviews

    Dialectics of the Heart

    The word "dialectic" is defined here as the struggle between opposites, and that couldn't be more the case when 端ber-rigid academic Elizabeth Drewer (Sharon Lawrence) falls hard for her hot-blooded young teaching assistant Richard Amado (Nicholas Gonzalez).

  • Reviews

    Gaslight

    Though the 1944 George Cukor film version is generally considered a classic, this long-winded tale of extreme mental cruelty, and worse, hasn't aged well.

  • Reviews

    St. Joan and the Dancing Sickness

    Somewhere in rural Louisiana in 1999, a community is forced to face up to the cruelty and corruption of its state government.

  • Reviews

    Never Land

    In writer-director Phyllis Nagy’s unnerving 1998 tragicomedy the playwright explores ennui and tensions emanating from European class and cultural differences and within family relationships.