LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    St. Joan and the Dancing Sickness

    Somewhere in rural Louisiana in 1999, a community is forced to face up to the cruelty and corruption of its state government.

  • Reviews

    Never Land

    In writer-director Phyllis Nagy’s unnerving 1998 tragicomedy the playwright explores ennui and tensions emanating from European class and cultural differences and within family relationships.

  • Reviews

    Back to Babylon

    In this self-crafted solo show, Gregg Tomé starts and ends as a man who refuses to attend his 10-year high school reunion but then spends his increasingly inebriated evening recalling many of his friends.

  • Reviews

    Quarterlife

    Talk about strange bedfellows: The envelope-pushing Rude Guerrilla Theater Company tackles a classic 1965 musical.

  • Reviews

    Battle Hymn

    In Jim Leonard's bracingly literate new play, Martha embarks on a 150-year odyssey, carrying her unborn child across treacherous battlefields -- literal and figurative.

  • Reviews

    The Playground

    Few musicals in recent years have been more frustrating than this one. The subject matter-homeless youth-is compelling.

  • Reviews

    Jackson Frost

    All of the performances were so exquisitely alive, the arts of listening and unselfconscious participation so in full use, that this had to be one of those heightened evenings that result from offstage exigencies.

  • Reviews

    The Taming of the Shrew

    Shakespeare's classic comedy didn't need to be set in the postwar Italy of 1948 to showcase its biggest laughs. But in doing so, director Carl Reggiardo is able to ratchet up the slapstick in this under-the-stars staging.

  • Reviews

    Still Photos

    Elements of this memory play are well-conceived and well-staged. The intertwining of past and present is structured seamlessly, as a grandmother relives her doomed love affair with another woman.

  • Reviews

    Freezing Antarctica

    "Standing on your head, anything is possible-in freezing Antarctica." Bill Sterritt frequently uses this refrain in his quirky play, which he also directs.