LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    The Immigrant

    This handsome and enjoyable production packs an emotional punch.

  • Reviews

    The Underpants

    Comedy is sticky-wicket business. It gets even trickier when 100 years pass and translation is involved.

  • Reviews

    Harm's Way

    It's a grim, eloquent, tautly written play, skillfully directed by Steve Zuckerman on a bleak, all-gray set. Stehlin richly captures the grief and gravitas of a career officer who must face the fact that his personal hell has become enmeshed with the hell of war.

  • Reviews

    Putting It Together

    As a black-tie party in a Manhattan skyscraper progresses and everyone drinks a little too much, intimate secrets emerge as the characters confront their lives and ambitions.

  • Reviews

    The Beverly Hills Psychiatrist

    More a skit than a play, the American premiere of this play by Cornelius Schnauber, translated by John Howard and Anne Adams, is exactly what you hoped for, given the play's title.

  • Reviews

    The Time Machine

    Until Julian Bane and Phil Abatecola clicked on to their laptops, no one had attempted a stage version of this far-reaching fantasy. This ill-fated version doesn't bid fair to be the one that breaks down any barriers.

  • Reviews

    Open Window

    "Open Window," presented by Deaf West Theatre in association with and at Pasadena Playhouse, 39 S. El Molino Ave., Pasadena. Tue.-Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 5 & 9 p.m., Sun. 2 & 7 p.m. (Also Wed. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 2; 2 p.m. Nov. 9.) Oct. 21-Nov. 20. $37-53. (626) 356-7529.

  • Reviews

    The Julio Brothers

    In Gino Aquino and Lance Petersen's one-act play, theJulio Brothersare a trio of Rochester, N.Y., siblings who flunk out of a thriving career as drug dealers and decide to give the legit world a try.

  • Reviews

    Hello and Goodbye

    Fugard's play about more domestic concerns.

  • Reviews

    Dames at Sea

    This 1968 Off-Broadway relic has remained a durable confection due to its sweetness of spirit in affectionately serving up a pastiche rather than spoofing, channeling the quaint but charming conventions of 1930s tuners.