LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Mysterious Skin

    The 2003 play by Prince Gomolvilas, like the 2004 film by Gregg Araki, is based on Scott Heim's 1995 novel about two 18-year-olds from a small town in Kansas whose lives took radically different directions after a common experience as Little Leaguers 10 years earlier.

  • Reviews

    Sexual Perversity In Chicago

    There's quite a bit of comedy and fireworks inherent in David Mamet's collection of vignettes that chart the rise and fall of a romantic relationship, as well as male and female attitudes toward sex and the opposite gender.

  • Reviews

    A Bed and a Bar

    Carlos Javier Castillo's shrill battle-of-the-sexes comedy is a protracted sketch billed as a play. Beginning with the first scene, sizable chunks of the two-hour running time involve chauvinistic boors who lewdly expound on their insatiable libidos, brag about their sexual conquests in clinical detail, and categorize women as disposable ...

  • Reviews

    Table Manners

    You know the obligatory applause a "star" gets on his or her first entrance?

  • Reviews

    The Glass Menagerie

    Memory is a tricky gift. So are memory plays. From the start this Tennessee Williams classic lets us know it is a memory play.

  • Reviews

    Pot Mom

    There's a joint simile to reach for here, but I can't think of it.

  • Reviews

    Jay Johnson: The Two & Only

    To illustrate the dubious esteem in which the art is often held, ventriloquist Jay Johnson tells of once being rebuked after a college show by several campus Christians who informed him that Satan was the first ventriloquist, having thrown his voice into the serpent to tempt Eve.

  • Reviews

    Cabaret

    Presented by and at the Simi Valley Cultural Arts Center, 3050 E. Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Jan. 6-Feb. 12. (805) 583-7900

  • Reviews

    Cash On Delivery

    Ray Cooney is widely considered the master of modern British farce. And while Cooney's son Michael is known more for screenwriting, this play is proof that father and son share a similar flair for farce.