Movie Review

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  • Reviews

    The Trip

    Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon may be the funniest impressionists in all of Britain, but they turn their characters' hilarious hop through England's north country into surprisingly tender voyages of self-discovery.

  • Reviews

    The Burning Plain

    "The Burning Plain," starring Charlize Theron and Kim Basinger, is a disturbing psychological mystery weaving four seemingly disparate stories.

  • Reviews

    The Private Lives of Pippa Lee

    It's not that this film is dreadful; it's just dull. Pippa (Robin Wright) has been happily married for several decades to a man (Alan Arkin) 30 years her senior.

  • Reviews

    Rabbit Hole

    Screenwriter David Lindsay-Abaire's celluloid version of his play "Rabbit Hole," brilliantly directed by John Cameron Mitchell, offers a surprisingly fresh take on the writer's compelling drama, punctuated with wry humor.

  • Reviews

    Death in Love

    "Death in Love" is an original and fascinating film that is nonetheless difficult to watch. Sections are repellent, some might say pornographic.

  • Reviews

    Anonymous

    Screenwriter John Orloff tried to get his story about a fraudulent Shakespeare on the screen for 15 years, but that other movie (yes, "Shakespeare in Love") stood in the way.

  • Reviews

    J. Edgar

    Ambitious, controversial, speculative, engaging, and sometimes frustrating, Clint Eastwood's "J. Edgar" is a worthy, if at times uneven, attempt to encapsulate the life of the man who ruled the FBI for nearly 50 years.

  • Reviews

    Adam Resurrected

    Every awards season, there are inevitably a handful of World War II related films vying for attention. These films are always tough and tiring to watch, yet they remain catnip for Academy voters.

  • Reviews

    A Better Life

    Carlos dreams of a better future for himself and his teenage son, Luis, who is finding himself pulled increasingly closer into gang activity as he distances himself from his father.

  • Reviews

    Management

    "I'm sorry. Sweet just doesn't cut it," Jennifer Aniston's character, Sue Claussen, tells defeated suitor Mike Cranshaw, played by Steve Zahn. That sums up this so-so romantic comedy, which, while sweet, doesn't cut it in the romance and comedy departments.