Movie Review

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  • Reviews

    The Art of Getting By

    "The Art of Getting By" is one of those quirky character-driven movies so slight you won't remember the title or even seeing it a week later.

  • Reviews

    Terri

    "Terri" is the coming-of-age story of a plus-size high school outcast. The plot may sound familiar, but, unlike other films, the main character appears unaffected by name-calling or criticism.

  • Reviews

    The Trip

    Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon may be the funniest impressionists in all of Britain, but they turn their characters' hilarious hop through England's north country into surprisingly tender voyages of self-discovery.

  • Reviews

    Love N' Dancing

    It's hard to believe this film got all the way to theatres with the title 'Love N' Dancing', but—as when a waltz or samba is announced—at least one knows what to expect.

  • Reviews

    On TV: 'Glee'

    'Nip/Tuck' was a groundbreaking FX drama that's become lost in its tired desire to shock, but Fox's 'Glee' is a tightly done hybrid of musical and dramedy that's unabashedly heartfelt.

  • Reviews

    Cheri

    The enormously talented triad of actor Michelle Pfeiffer, director Stephen Frears, and writer Christopher Hampton, who teamed so memorably two decades ago in "Dangerous Liaisons," are back in period mode with the modestly engaging but deliciously acted "Cheri."

  • Reviews

    I Love You, Beth Cooper

    We should have had a clue from the first two words that appear onscreen: Fox Atomic. The recently disbanded production entity responsible for such gems as "Miss March" and "The Hills Have Eyes 2" is also behind "I Love You, Beth Cooper."

  • Reviews

    Tony Manero

    Chile's official entry into Oscar consideration for best foreign-language film is this idiosyncratic black comedy, seamlessly combining a tense crime story, quirky character study, and high-stakes political drama into a compelling whole that brims with originality.

  • Reviews

    Choke

    The overall tapestry ofChokedevolves into a lackluster game played by a character held at arm's length from the audience.

  • Reviews

    Flash of Genius

    In the end, even at two hours, the film is deeply involving. This is a sure-fire Oscar nomination for the talented Greg Kinnear as a lone individual up against a giant corporation.