New York Theater

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  • Reviews

    North

    January in New York means slushy sidewalks, unfulfilled New Year's resolutions, and post-holiday urban malaise.

  • Reviews

    Poppies

    Expertly staged by Sherri Eden Barber in a style of gritty realism, the work focuses on several young people caught up in a hell of war, illegal arms dealing, drugs, genocide, propaganda, and racism.

  • Reviews

    Griot: He Who Speaks The Sweet Word

    More than mere storytelling,Griot: He Who Speaks the Sweet Wordbrilliantly enlightens and uplifts as it dramatizes the history of Africans in America through the beat, the word, and lots of creativity. Subtitled "a choreopoem," it skillfully weaves music, movement, and text, beginning with "the beat as the transportation system ...

  • Reviews

    Passing Strange

    Passing Strange, which opened Off-Broadway May 14, isn't in the running for a Tony Award, and for the favorites, this is good news.

  • Reviews

    Moonlight

    The genius of Harold Pinter is his ability to take commonplace situations and ordinary people, then warp their world with a hyper-realistic, often illogical theatricality.

  • Reviews

    Offices

    Even though it clocks in at a mere 75 minutes, Ethan Coen's latest collection of one-acts wears out its welcome long before it's over, mistaking as it does banality for hipness.

  • Reviews

    The Temperamentals

    Gay artists are reclaiming their history. Like "Milk," Jon Marans has done something similar for Harry Hay in his bright and affecting new play, "The Temperamentals."

  • Reviews

    Pound

    Ezra Pound, the influential American poet accused of treason during World War II but never tried, finally gets his chance for a jury verdict in "Pound," written and directed by William Roetzheim.

  • Reviews

    Darling

    The most memorable moments in "Darling," the new dance-theatre piece by choreographer Sam Kim, are the many entrances and exits of its four dancers.