New York Theater

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  • Reviews

    Moonlight

    The genius of Harold Pinter is his ability to take commonplace situations and ordinary people, then warp their world with a hyper-realistic, often illogical theatricality.

  • Reviews

    Griot: He Who Speaks The Sweet Word

    More than mere storytelling,Griot: He Who Speaks the Sweet Wordbrilliantly enlightens and uplifts as it dramatizes the history of Africans in America through the beat, the word, and lots of creativity. Subtitled "a choreopoem," it skillfully weaves music, movement, and text, beginning with "the beat as the transportation system ...

  • Reviews

    Passing Strange

    Passing Strange, which opened Off-Broadway May 14, isn't in the running for a Tony Award, and for the favorites, this is good news.

  • Reviews

    The Unusual Suspects

    Unapologetic silliness — much of it quite funny — runs rampant through the musical whodunitThe Unusual Suspects.

  • Reviews

    Candida

    Michael Halberstam has given George Bernard Shaw's early comedy a very polished revival that is elegant and amusing.

  • Reviews

    Capture Now

    Josh Jonas is a suitable storyteller, but his writing inCapture Now, his one-man show about brotherly bonds, could use some serious work.

  • Reviews

    The Orestia

    In David Johnston's freewheeling adaptation, the playwright has condensed the famed Greek tragedy of supreme familial dysfunction into a mere two hours.

  • Reviews

    Avenue X

    This production, set in the doo-wop world of Gravesend, Brooklyn, in 1963, is technically superb and, ironically, ultimately soulless.

  • Reviews

    My First Time

    As cyber technology seeps deeper into our existence, theatre, like every other aspect of daily life, is gradually becoming more fragmentary, like the bytes and bits that make up our superfast, limited-attention-span world.