New York Theater

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  • Reviews

    The Dispute

    As Pierre Marivaux'sThe Disputebegins, a prince (Alfredo Narciso) and the woman he loves (Jennifer Ikeda) ponder whether a man or a woman was responsible for the world's first infidelity.

  • Reviews

    3 Sisters

    In addition to a daunting three-hour running time in a teeny-tiny theatre, the pace of this particular production lapses with annoying frequency.

  • Reviews

    Sin

    This play based on Isaac Bashevis Singer's "The Unseen" is a spooky adult fable, yet despite strong performances and vivid design, it drags as much as it provokes.

  • Reviews

    Gin & "It"

    Director Reid Farrington's latest video-theater piece is as entertaining and enchanting as a murder mystery of Hitchcockian standards.

  • Reviews

    End of the Road

    Maybe it's not so surprising that the Young@Heart Chorus' "End of the Road" could make you laugh or cry. But it can also make a full crowd dance.

  • Reviews

    Through the Night

    An original yet recognizable community in contemporary Harlem comes blazingly alive in this one-person but multicharacter show by writer-performer Daniel Beaty.

  • Reviews

    The Kid

    Musicalizing sex columnist Dan Savage's 1999 book about adopting a child with his boyfriend might seem an unpromising idea, but the New Group's "The Kid" quickly persuades otherwise.

  • Reviews

    Ensemble Studio Theatre Marathon 2010, Series A

    "Where the Children Are," the final work in Series A of Ensemble Studio Theatre's 2010 marathon of one-act plays, delivers emotional clout and makes up for the lackluster quartet that precedes it. 

  • Reviews

    Prophecy

    Karen Malpede crams in every major international crisis of the past 70 years in this political melodrama. Fortunately, Kathleen Chalfant illuminates the convoluted plot.

  • Reviews

    Being Harold Pinter

    One has to admire the Belarus Free Theatre for its dedication and courage, but its offstage story of getting to the United States is more gripping than its Harold Pinter program.