Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    The Book of Mormon

    The gleefully sophomoric sensibilities of "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone perfectly mesh with the Broadway brio of Robert Lopez and Casey Nicholaw in this raw and riotous musical satire.

  • Reviews

    Ghetto Klown

    John Leguizamo is in top form in "Ghetto Klown," his fifth solo effort, an entertaining combination of standup routine, autobiography, and Hollywood gossip fest.

  • Reviews

    Priscilla Queen of the Desert

    The stage version of the 1994 cult film comedy is a gut-busting ride through the outback that will be keeping a lot of chorus boys in sequins and feathers for many a season.

  • Reviews

    Arcadia

    Despite several topflight turns, director David Leveaux's production of Tom Stoppard's eloquent play is just fuzzy enough to keep us out of "Arcadia."

  • Reviews

    That Championship Season

    Director Gregory Mosher's reverent revival of Jason Miller's 1972 mutliple-award-winning drama only succeeds in highlighting the dated script's flaws, despite the efforts of a mostly strong cast.

  • Reviews

    Good People

    Though there' a great deal to like about David Lindsay-Abaire's new play, and director Daniel Sullivan's production is full of fine performances, it's just a tad too well-made for its own good.

  • Reviews

    Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark

    There are spectacular stunts and imaginative stage pictures in Julie Taymor's gargantuan comic book of a show, but overall this is an incomprehensible web with a thin plot and a generic score.

  • Reviews

    The Importance of Being Earnest

    Brian Bedford stages a near-perfect rendition of Oscar Wilde's whimsical classic and gives a pitch-perfect performance as Lady Bracknell without stooping to drag-queen excesses or even raising his voice to a falsetto.

  • Reviews

    Donny & Marie: A Broadway Christmas

    Donny and Marie Osmond both work hard for the holiday cheer in this Vegas-style entertainment; the trouble is that we can see them sweat. Kudos to Marie for a supple and versatile voice.

  • Reviews

    Elling

    Brendan Fraser and Denis O'Hare have terrific rapport as two polar-opposite social misfits released into the world from a state mental institution in this quirky, intimate comedy-drama.