Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    Archbishop Supreme Tartuffe

    Here's a high-concept idea: Tartuffe, Molière's timeless purveyor of religious hokum, as an African-American preacher-huckster.

  • Reviews

    Dance of the Seven Headed Mouse

    Ostensibly the narrow story of the surviving three-fourths of yet another dysfunctional family, "Dance of the Seven Headed Mouse" reaches for the broader themes of inherited addiction, parental neglect, and the salvation of friendship.

  • Reviews

    Shafrika, the White Girl

    When the talented Anika Larsen arrives on stage in "Shafrika, the White Girl," you wonder how the set of images being presented will be transformed into a full evening's entertainment.

  • Reviews

    Stunning

    Late in "Stunning," a woman stands center stage and mutters, "I can't end it." Sometimes authors have a way of infecting characters with their own struggles.

  • Reviews

    The Wiz

    This innovative revival of "The Wiz," the 1975 soul and rock adaptation of L. Frank Baum's classic fairy tale, drenches the audience with a downpour of pizzazz and talent.

  • Reviews

    Sweet Storm

    Two fetching performances, by Eric T. Miller and Jamie Dunn, breathe indelible life into Scott Hudson's slim but evocative "Sweet Storm."

  • Reviews

    FUBAR

    See "FUBAR" if you want to experience theatrical shock and awe. So smart, entertaining, stylish, and surprising is Karl Gajdusek's play that it risks looking too slick and hip in any description.

  • Reviews

    Dov and Ali

    Dov and Ali begins: "Once upon a time, in the middle of a school in the middle of Detroit in the middle of the United States of America, there was a confused teacher and there was a precocious student."

  • Reviews

    #9

    Think of the first half of "#9" as the best kind of first date you can possibly imagine: The chemistry is strong and dynamic. Think of the second half of #9 as, well, if not the worst second date you can possibly imagine, certainly one of the worst.

  • Reviews

    Richard III: An Arab Tragedy

    Sulayman Al-Bassam takes Shakespeare's history play about the infamous ruler and transforms it into a compelling portrait of political maneuvering in a contemporary Arab monarchy.