Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    Amerissiah

    Derek Ahonen's play, here in its Off-Broadway premiere after debuting Off-Off-Broadway in 2008, is as ambitious and self-defeating as the culture it sets out to save.

  • Reviews

    How Much Is Enough?: Our Values in Question

    The Foundry Theatre's new production feels like an unusual group-therapy session that, though at times forced and treacly, manages to be quite powerful in spite of itself.

  • Reviews

    Blood and Gifts

    Playwright J.T. Rogers takes a bracing, multisided look at how America came to be mired in a war against fundamentalism in Afghanistan in this gripping and absorbing drama.

  • Reviews

    The Habit of Art

    The National Theatre concludes its pilot season of broadcasts to movie theaters with a hilarious, bracing, and multileveled rumination on the creative process.

  • Reviews

    An Error of the Moon

    Historical drama becomes lurid soap opera in Luigi Creatore's "speculation" on the brothers Booth.

  • Reviews

    Ruined

    Rarely does a play take you to a corner of the world you hardly ever think about and force you to care fiercely for the people in it. Lynn Nottage's shattering work Ruined, presented by Manhattan Theatre Club in a co-production with Chicago's Goodman Theatre after a successful ...

  • Reviews

    Nation

    The National Theatre of Great Britain's series of broadcasts to movie theaters continues with a sprawling fantasy that will enchant both adults and children.

  • Reviews

    Three Pianos

    While this unique combination of frat party and musical history lesson is sometimes entertaining and informative, it's way too loosey-goosey to be ultimately satisfying. Plenty of free booze, though.

  • Reviews

    Love Song

    This high-gloss production nicely nails the author-director's absurdist punch lines but is less than convincing when it comes to illuminating the play's underlying premise.

  • Reviews

    It's Always Right Now, Until It's Later

    Daniel Kitson's impeccably self-aware and comic telling of two intersecting tales seems quotidian yet represents a radical paradigm shift in how we view life itself.