Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    Triangle

    This joint effort of a playwright and a historian about the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire is both sketchy in its history and lacking in dramatic tension.

  • Reviews

    The Habit of Art

    The National Theatre concludes its pilot season of broadcasts to movie theaters with a hilarious, bracing, and multileveled rumination on the creative process.

  • Reviews

    Bloodsong of Love

    Spirited performances and some toe-tapping tunes, along with clever staging and design, are not enough to disguise the repetitive excesses of this promising tuner parodying spaghetti westerns.

  • Reviews

    It's Always Right Now, Until It's Later

    Daniel Kitson's impeccably self-aware and comic telling of two intersecting tales seems quotidian yet represents a radical paradigm shift in how we view life itself.

  • Reviews

    Hamlet

    For this National Theatre production, broadcast to cinemas worldwide, Nicholas Hytner finds a new interpretation of the most famous play in Western history and creates an Elsinore based on constant surveillance and deceit.

  • Reviews

    Zero Hour

    Writer-performer Jim Brochu takes on a daunting task in his new solo show about actor Zero Mostel, one of the greatest and most outsized talents ever to grace the American stage and screen.

  • Reviews

    #9

    Think of the first half of "#9" as the best kind of first date you can possibly imagine: The chemistry is strong and dynamic. Think of the second half of #9 as, well, if not the worst second date you can possibly imagine, certainly one of the worst.

  • Reviews

    Play Dead

    Performer Todd Robbins serves up some chills, a few laughs, a little macabre history, and several incredible illusions in this contemporary riff on midnight spook shows.

  • Reviews

    Brian Dykstra's Ho!

    This new one-man holiday show has its moments but fails to ignite good cheer in the audience's heart.

  • Reviews

    St. Nicholas

    The appeal of Conor McPherson's one-man play is in its value as a prologue of uncertain promise to a playwright's remarkable career.