Off-Broadway Review

Sort by:

  • Reviews

    Vieux Carré

    When 'Vieux Carré' opened on Broadway, it was savaged by the critics as a second-rate effort by a played-out playwright and it barely eked out a two-week run. Reviewers of the day accused Williams of ransacking his old bag of tricks.

  • Reviews

    Billy Eichner: Gay, White, and Terrified!

    Don't be fooled by the title of Billy Eichner's new one-man show at Joe's Pub, because this gay comic isn't terrified of anything (certainly not of Hugh Jackman's handlers).

  • Reviews

    The Success of Failure (Or, The Failure Of Success)

    For an antidote to workweek weariness, see Cynthia Hopkins' astonishing and sweet space-opera-cum-self-discovery journey 'The Success of Failure (Or, The Failure of Success)'.

  • Reviews

    Don't Leave It All to Your Children

    A few mild chuckles is the most you can expect from 'Don't Leave It All to Your Children', a harmless 90-minute musical revue about senior citizens, playing matinees and Saturday nights at the Actors Temple.

  • Reviews

    The Rivalry

    The timing is right for this revival of the 99-year-old Corwin's 1959 drama, following a divisive presidential campaign in which race was not the main issue but a strong undercurrent.

  • Reviews

    American Hwangap

    When Min Suk Chun's American dream fell through, he left his family in suburban Texas to put his life back together in his native Korea. After 15 years of intermittent communication, he rejoins them to celebrate his hwangap—his 60th birthday and the completion of the zodiac cycle.

  • Reviews

    A Play on Words

    The playwright Yasmina Reza would not only recognize but probably salute "A Play on Words," Brian Dykstra's corrosively funny two-hander.

  • Reviews

    Groundswell

    "We sent our eldest daughter to a multiracial school in Swaziland for two years—in the '80s." If you want to understand the gnawing power of Ian Bruce's new play 'Groundswell', look to that line. It describes a self-sacrificing commitment to racial equality or a hollow gesture from a ...

  • Reviews

    Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson: The Concert Version

    Making its New York debut, this newest bit of pop playfulness from Les Freres Corbusier is a silly-smart entertainment that feels like a fifth-grade pageant hatched under the tutelage of The Harvard Lampoon and composed by Spinal Tap.

  • Reviews

    Sundown Names and Night-Gone Things

    The line that separates a professional production from an amateur one isn't about stars or budget or location. It's a matter of details, such as period-appropriate costumes, not giving characters Styrofoam cups for a play set in 1938, and making the most of a limited playing area.