Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    Two Unrelated Plays by David Mamet

    David Mamet forsakes profanity to mine laughs in ancient Rome and twist words at a modern school. The results are hilarious.

  • Reviews

    The Success of Failure (Or, The Failure Of Success)

    For an antidote to workweek weariness, see Cynthia Hopkins' astonishing and sweet space-opera-cum-self-discovery journey 'The Success of Failure (Or, The Failure of Success)'.

  • Reviews

    Exit Cuckoo

    In 'Exit Cuckoo', playwright-performer Lisa Ramirez gives voice to the voiceless.

  • Reviews

    Dov and Ali

    Dov and Ali begins: "Once upon a time, in the middle of a school in the middle of Detroit in the middle of the United States of America, there was a confused teacher and there was a precocious student."

  • Reviews

    Gatz

    At first Elevator Repair Service's marathon adaptation of Fitzgerald's classic novel is forced and gimmicky, but once the company allows the novel to speak for itself, it's an absorbing re-creation of one of the greatest works of American literature.

  • Reviews

    Red Sea Fish

    Matt Wilkinson's new play is a complex exploration of family relationships and the imagination of the human mind, and it's been shipped here straight from Brighton.

  • Reviews

    The Myopia and Plays

    With "The Myopia," David Greenspan makes magic; with "Plays," he writes a love letter; with both, he puts theatre and life back in the present tense.

  • Reviews

    666

    Who'd have thought that a show about four men in prison getting beaten, raped, electrocuted, hung, and guillotined would be so hilarious? The Madrid-based troupe Yllana obviously did.

  • Reviews

    Palestine

    Najla Saïd examines politics, perception, and prejudice in this fascinating, complex stage memoir about her journey of ethnic identity as an Arab American.

  • Reviews

    Sin

    This play based on Isaac Bashevis Singer's "The Unseen" is a spooky adult fable, yet despite strong performances and vivid design, it drags as much as it provokes.