Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    An Error of the Moon

    Historical drama becomes lurid soap opera in Luigi Creatore's "speculation" on the brothers Booth.

  • Reviews

    Ruined

    Rarely does a play take you to a corner of the world you hardly ever think about and force you to care fiercely for the people in it. Lynn Nottage's shattering work Ruined, presented by Manhattan Theatre Club in a co-production with Chicago's Goodman Theatre after a successful ...

  • Reviews

    Parents' Evening

    Though the writing is sharp enough to sustain interest from moment to moment, in the end this compact 75-minute work (including intermission) seems incomplete, as if it wants somehow to be part of a fuller canvas.

  • Reviews

    A Play on Words

    The playwright Yasmina Reza would not only recognize but probably salute "A Play on Words," Brian Dykstra's corrosively funny two-hander.

  • Reviews

    Newyorkland

    Temporary Distortion's new film-theater piece about the private life of cops is strongest when it lets its stories speak for themselves and weakest when it dips into sentimentality.

  • Reviews

    Picked

    The talented Christopher Shinn seems to have set himself a difficult task with this irritating offering: writing a play largely devoid of dramatic conflict.

  • Reviews

    Summer Shorts 4: Series B

    The one-acts of "Summer Shorts 4: Series B" are linked by moments of development and personal growth: a graduation ceremony, a reconciliation, a pregnancy, a reunion.

  • Reviews

    The Forest

    Classic Stage Company gets lost in the 'Forest' with an uneven production of Alexander Ostrovsky's rarely performed 1870 comedy.

  • Reviews

    …Another Man's Poison

    A potentially fascinating examination of race, class, sexuality, and gender is given the soap-opera treatment.

  • Reviews

    Chasing Manet

    Only Tina Howe, the author of such eccentric and lyrical works as Painting Churches and Coastal Disturbances, could take what is essentially an episode of The Golden Girls and turn it into a tenderly sad and riotously funny meditation on age, family, and freedom of expression.