Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    'We Are Proud to Present a Presentation...' Rocks Soho Rep

    At Soho Rep, Jackie Sibblies Drury’s “We Are Proud to Present a Presentation…,” about Germany’s virtual extermination of the Herero people of Namibia, is pulse-pounding theater.

  • Reviews

    'The Wonderful Wizard of Song' Salutes Composer Harold Arlen

    “The Wonderful Wizard of Song” offers a brisk, affable, and professionally rendered survey of Harold Arlen’s work, but the iconic composer deserves greater emotional commitment.

  • Reviews

    ‘The Madrid’ Evaporates Before Our Eyes

    It’s hard to fathom how Manhattan Theatre Club allowed Liz Flahive’s undercooked comedy-drama “The Madrid,” starring Edie Falco, to get all the way to City Center’s downstairs stage.

  • Reviews

    The Other Place

    Sharr White's taut, incisive puzzle play, beautifully directed by Joe Mantello and featuring a raw and riveting Laurie Metcalf, tells a harrowing and moving tale.

  • Reviews

    Mary Broome

    Mint Theater Company’s captivating revival of Allan Monkhouse’s slyly subversive 1911 drawing-room comedy, “Mary Broome,” ranks right up there with the troupe’s best offerings.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'Into the Woods'

    Brit helmers Timothy Sheader and Liam Steel have enthrallingly re-imagined Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's "Into the Woods" for Shakespeare in the Park.

  • Reviews

    'Totally Tubular Time Machine' Scores High on the Fun Index

    “Totally Tubular Time Machine,” at Culture Club, is an interactive theatrical experience in a real nightclub that’s part musical revue, part homage to popular music, and all party.

  • Reviews

    ‘From White Plains’ Is as Thoughtful as It Is Passionate

    Fault Line Theatre’s “From White Plains,” playwright-director Michael Perlman’s new drama about high school bullying, written in collaboration with its cast, poses tough questions.

  • Reviews

    'Zelda at the Oasis' Comes Up Dry

    Despite tour de force work from Gardner Reed and Edwin Cahill, P.H. Lin’s “Zelda at the Oasis,” a two-hander about F. Scott Fitzgerald’s bipolar wife, doesn’t jell or persuade.

  • Reviews

    Photograph 51

    The DNA of Anna Ziegler's new play reveals an engrossing story by a talented writer. This tale of a lone, wondrous woman amidst a casual conspiracy of males makes for compelling theater.