Off-Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    An Evening at the Carlyle

    If only "An Evening at the Carlyle" were, in fact, at the Carlyle. Al Tapper's recherché songs would go down so much easier with a Courvoisier chaser.

  • Reviews

    Heart of the City

    "Heart and the City" has one of those scripts in which several tenuously connected characters grapple with big and small issues in New York City.

  • Reviews

    Someone in Florida Loves Me

    Written and directed by the very talented Jane Pickett, "Someone in Florida Loves Me" is just a sliver of a play, but it's none the less potent for it.

  • Reviews

    From Russia with Angst

    Five members of the WorkShop Theater Company have adapted five Chekhov short stories into one-act plays in "From Russia With Angst." Unfortunately, the short length of each hampers the subtlety and nuance for which Chekhov is renowned.

  • Reviews

    Pound

    Ezra Pound, the influential American poet accused of treason during World War II but never tried, finally gets his chance for a jury verdict in "Pound," written and directed by William Roetzheim.

  • Reviews

    The Funeral Director's Wife

    I've been to actual funerals that had more life than "The Funeral Director's Wife."  This disjointed, rambling new comedy is being advertised as a classic piece of Americana along the lines of  "Spoon River Anthology" and "Our Town."

  • Reviews

    Marathon 2009: Series B

    Quantity doesn't always equal quality, and such is the case with these five one-acts, with promising premises stretched to the breaking point, repeatedly straining the audience's patience.

  • Reviews

    Belle of the Ball Bearings

    Even at a mere 60 minutes, Elizabeth Battersby's new one-woman musical, Belle of the Ball Bearings, threatens to outstay its welcome.

  • Reviews

    Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines

    Goofball antics have deeper meaning in Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines, a three-man caper that starts off hysterically but ultimately becomes a tedious exercise in silly physical comedy.

  • Reviews

    The Pied Pipers of the Lower East Side

    The Amoralists is a theater company that claims not to be "concerned with the principals of right or wrong, good or bad," an attitude that could endanger the success of its productions.