Off-Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    Into the Hazard [Henry 5]

    The staging's focal point is a television suspended above the stage on which theatergoers watch Austin Switser's expertly crafted video sequences.

  • Reviews

    Strangers

    Is it possible to do something with faint praise other than damn? Perhaps appreciate or even encourage? If so, 'Strangers', a new piece from the Shalimar developed in the Ontological-Hysteric Incubator, deserves that treatment.

  • Reviews

    Dr. C (Or How I Learned to Act in Eight Steps)

    Theater Mitu takes the fascinating idea of dramatizing the philosophies of eight master acting teachers and ends up demonstrating the term sophomoric.

  • Reviews

    In the Silence of the Heart

    Joanna Chan's new production, 'In the Silence of the Heart', originally conceived for the inmates of Sing Sing prison, retains a lingering amateurish quality that does her earnest, implausible script no favors.

  • Reviews

    Fifth of July

    'Fifth of July', Lanford Wilson's classic play about the disillusionment of flower children in the aftermath of the Vietnam War, is currently receiving a sparkling revival courtesy of T. Schreiber Studio.

  • Reviews

    Asclepius

    'Asclepius',  has all the hokey charm and good intentions of a 16th-century masque created by high school students. It is colorful, earnest, and on the nose, with explanatory lyrics, mostly dull music, uneven performances, and occasionally engaging spectacle.

  • Reviews

    Marathon 2009: Series A

    Looking back on the "good old days" can be comforting in these trying times. But in this quintet of promising though never completely satisfying plays, even the golden age of Eisenhower and JFK are tinged with darkness.

  • Reviews

    William and the Tradesmen

    It's not much fun spending an evening with a man who complains about his band, his book, his acting career, his improv group, and all the many women he's either banged or is contemplating banging.

  • Reviews

    The Children's Hour

    When "The Children's Hour" premiered on Broadway in 1934, it shocked audiences with its bold story of a pair of schoolteachers accused of lesbianism.

  • Reviews

    Reflections: An Evening of Short Plays

    The vagueness of the umbrella title for this collection of five playlets points up the difficulty of finding a common theme here. Three of the pieces are world premieres, while two are vintage works by Chekhov and Beckett.