Off-Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    The Cambria

    "The Cambria" was the name of the ship that in 1845 took the great African American Frederick Douglass from Boston to Ireland.

  • Reviews

    For the Love of Christ!

    Unfortunately for writer-composer Ben Knox, his largely unclever low-camp musical "For the Love of Christ!" is neither intelligent enough to be satirical nor ballsy enough to be subversive.

  • Reviews

    Red Fly/Blue Bottle

    Red Fly/Blue Bottle is a dark radio-era wonderland where everyday objects such as pins, teacups, and springs taking on epic proportions.

  • Reviews

    You'll Be Happy When I'm Dead

    Bill Rutkoski's superficial comedy incomprehensibly attempts to center a full-length play on an already-tired stereotype: the overbearing mother. The result is reminiscent of a standup act.

  • Reviews

    Babel Tower

    Set in 1950 Texas, this play might have worked if conceived as a screwball comedy, but as written it's an earnest, maladroit, nearly risible drama.

  • Reviews

    Good Bobby

    As Robert F. Kennedy, Brian Lee Franklin mutters zippy comebacks and frustrated retorts with aplomb. As the author of the play "Good Bobby," he shows less skill.

  • Reviews

    The Three Times She Knocked

    A.D. Penedo's intelligent and tightly written dramedy about lust and betrayal grabs from the first, an amusing cat-and-mouse game in the guise of budding romance under Christopher Windom's intense direction.

  • Reviews

    Under the Cross

    Even with an uneven production, this Yiddish play from the 1920s has the earmarks of a classic.

  • Reviews

    Vinnie Vidivici

    Theater doesn't get more basic than "Vinnie Vidivici": It's just one writer-director-performer sitting at a drum set and storytelling.

  • Reviews

    P.O.

    The downsizing of the workforce is one of the timeliest subjects around, but it's only given a light dusting over in "P.O.," Scott Klavan's two-hander about a pair of average-Joe postal workers.