Off-Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    Le Serpent Rouge

    Writer-director-choreographer Austin McCormick likes his opulence. With 'Le Serpent Rouge', he delivers a wildly flamboyant take on the Biblical story of Adam and Eve. Presiding over the action is a voluptuous Ringmistress (Gioia Marchese) who looks like she might have stepped out of Baz Luhrmann's 'Moulin Rouge'.

  • Reviews

    The Geographical History of America

    Lindsey Hope Pearlman and Randi Rivera's adaptation of Gertrude Stein's 1936 novel is, well, novel. (The full title of the source material is 'The Geographical History of America or the Relation of Human Nature to the Human Mind'.)

  • Reviews

    Squiggy and the Goldfish

    'Squiggy and the Goldfish' has a beautiful romance buried beneath layers of flabby slapstick and stale farce.

  • Reviews

    The Imaginary Invalid

    The Queens Players' version of The Imaginary Invalid is Molière updated with expressions such as "doesn't know his ass from his elbow," a pull-my-finger joke, and of course a swine flu reference.

  • Reviews

    When You Comin' Back, Red Ryder?

    It's a sad, greasy outpost of culinary refuse, a relic of hip 1950s-style eating that was anachronistic by the end of the 1960s, when 'Red Ryder'  takes place.

  • Reviews

    Finding the Rooster

    Terence Patrick Hughes' script certainly isn't to blame for the dismal production of his 'Finding the Rooster', currently crowing at 13th Street Repertory Company.

  • Reviews

    Way to Heaven (Himmelweg)

    More than 75 years after Hitler's ascension to power in Germany, the portrayal of Nazis on stage and screen is arguably more difficult than ever.

  • Reviews

    After Darwin

    In Timberlake Wertenbaker's richly layered 'After Darwin', theories of natural selection and survival of the fittest are discussed not only in relation to the evolution of animal species but also to human lives.

  • Reviews

    It Pays to Advertise

    Ambrose, one of the bright young men in this screwball comedy, exclaims, "Advertising is responsible for everything!"

  • Reviews

    Oh Virgil! A Theatrical Portrait

    As depicted by playwright-director Wallace Norman, the composer and music critic Virgil Thomson was one of the most irascible, impossible, and utterly obstreperous artists of the 20th century.