Off-Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    De Novo

    Literalism trumps naturalism in this heartfelt but ultimately wearisome docudrama about a troubled Guatemalan teenager who enters the U.S. illegally.

  • Reviews

    The Assistant

    The cast works hard to add character dimension in this too-straightforward telling of Bernard Malamud's story.

  • Reviews

    Quartet

    Mario Fratti's four short "gay-themed" plays all end with a twist, but the biggest twist is how little any of them say about contemporary gay life.

  • Reviews

    Protected

    Have we forgotten what the "Fringe" in Fringe Festival means? Apparently playwright-director Timothy Scott Harris has, because there's nothing fresh, original, or offbeat in his sagging new show "Protected."

  • Reviews

    The Mad 7

    "The Mad 7" retells the story of  an 18th-century Hasidic leader who died before finishing his story of an encounter with seven mystics as a San Francisco office worker accosted by deformed mystics on a coffee break.

  • Reviews

    El beso del adiós (Kiss Bessemer Goodbye)

    This by-the-books family drama has some laughs but not much else.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'The Stranger to Kindness'

    David Stallings' "The Stranger to Kindess," part of Frigid New York, employs too many clichés in its depiction of the loneliness of the urban jungle.

  • Reviews

    Cats Don't Grin

    "Cats Don't Grin" belongs to the theatrical tradition of the intense but ambiguous two-person encounter: A man and a woman meet in a nondescript room, where they exchange clothes, and indulge in elaborate role-playing games.

  • Reviews

    Sounding

    Jennifer Gibbs' new play seeks the mystery of existence only to drown in weak storytelling and empty dialogue.

  • Reviews

    A Cable From Gibralter

    Playwright Daniel Meltzer makes a game try at breathing new life into a bygone format, the well-made romantic comedy, but ends up with pretty weak tea.