Off-Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    God, Sex & Blue Water

    For much of its first act, Linda Faigao-Hall's "God, Sex & Blue Water" has the makings of a warm, revealing exploration of a little-chronicled immigrant subculture, the devotedly Catholic Filipinos of Hoboken.

  • Reviews

    Cathedral

    Playwright and director Joe Pintauro spins a tangled but probing web of faith, sexuality, and religion in 'Cathedral'.

  • Reviews

    Artifacts of Consequence

    On the one hand, playwright Ashlin Halfnight thankfully eschews clunky exposition in his post-apocalyptic play 'Artifacts of Consequence'.

  • Reviews

    In Security

    Wanting to do it all—to be a wife and a successful career person, a mother and a free spirit—is one of the defining struggles of the modern American female.

  • Reviews

    As You Like It

    It was the second preview of Frog & Peach Theatre Company's As You Like It, and during the first half a dispiriting air of sluggishness hung over both the court of Duke Frederick and the forest of Arden.

  • Reviews

    One Thing I Like to Say Is

    Playwright Amy Fox's writing has a surface quirkiness that doesn't quite disguise a disturbing worldview.

  • Reviews

    Trinity 5:29

    Men and women in whose seemingly ordinary lives lies the seed for unspeakable terrors have long fascinated writers. Just think of poor Pandora and that box or any number of horror movies in which someone accidentally frees a demon.

  • Reviews

    Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage

    While stimulating in concept, Banana Bag & Bodice's irreverent "songplay" Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage, an attempt to rescue the medieval epic poem from the suffocating tedium of academic criticism, is a theatrical misfire.

  • Reviews

    Tibet Does Not Exist

    Instead of claiming that a talented performer could make reading the phone book interesting, I'd like to suggest substituting playwright Don Thompson's Tibet Does Not Exist.

  • Reviews

    Red Fly/Blue Bottle

    Red Fly/Blue Bottle is a dark radio-era wonderland where everyday objects such as pins, teacups, and springs taking on epic proportions.