Off-Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    Gin & "It"

    Director Reid Farrington's latest video-theater piece is as entertaining and enchanting as a murder mystery of Hitchcockian standards.

  • Reviews

    Through the Night

    An original yet recognizable community in contemporary Harlem comes blazingly alive in this one-person but multicharacter show by writer-performer Daniel Beaty.

  • Reviews

    The Boxer

    Unless you need further proof that silence usually isn't golden in live theater, better to rerun a favorite silent movie whose artistry transcends its mechanics.

  • Reviews

    Greendale, G.P.

    This day-in-the-life drama about doctors in small-town Ohio isn't compelling enough but does offer some good performances and observant writing.

  • Reviews

    Never Norman Rockwell

    Kyle Baxter's new genial coming-out comedy finally proves to be too kindhearted for its own good.

  • Reviews

    The Beátitudes

    Melanie Cortier's bland balletic choreography of "The Beátitudes," a 35-minute dance play about the Beat movement, bears no resemblance whatsoever to Beat sensibilities.

  • Reviews

    Open Heart

    For the most part, Joe Salvatore's "verbatim interview play" about open relationships among gay men is engrossing and illuminating.

  • Reviews

    Pound

    Ezra Pound, the influential American poet accused of treason during World War II but never tried, finally gets his chance for a jury verdict in "Pound," written and directed by William Roetzheim.

  • Reviews

    Darling

    The most memorable moments in "Darling," the new dance-theatre piece by choreographer Sam Kim, are the many entrances and exits of its four dancers.

  • Reviews

    Ensemble Studio Theatre Marathon 2010, Series A

    "Where the Children Are," the final work in Series A of Ensemble Studio Theatre's 2010 marathon of one-act plays, delivers emotional clout and makes up for the lackluster quartet that precedes it.