Off-Off-Broadway Review

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  • Reviews

    Ajax in Iraq

    The tragic fates of the Greek warrior Ajax and a female American soldier in Iraq are intertwined in this well-meaning but uneven anti-war play.

  • Reviews

    Minimalist 'Hamlet' Provides Maximum Effect

    With this high-energy, minimalist, four-actor edition of William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet,” the theater ensemble Bedlam renders a passionate but richly textured Denmark for the ages.

  • Reviews

    Canadian Prize Winner 'The Drawer Boy' Makes Belated NY Debut

    Michael Healey’s quietly intense “The Drawer Boy,” from Oberon Theatre Ensemble, paints a portrait of devastating heartbreak leavened by the surprising healing power of theater.

  • Reviews

    'Moose Murders' Is Still a Bomb

    The Beautiful Soup Theater Collective revival of “Moose Murders,” Arthur Bicknell’s notorious 1983 Broadway flop parodying Agatha Christie murder mysteries, is bad all over again.

  • Reviews

    Pro-Life or Pro-Choice, ‘The Water Children’ Is Funny and Thought-Provoking

    Wendy MacLeod's “The Water Children” tackles the complex issue of abortion with wit and compassion in a sharp production from new theater company Goodly Rotten Apple Productions.

  • Reviews

    Depression-Era ‘Both Your Houses’ Presents Parallels to Today's Politics

    This staging of Maxwell Anderson’s rarely produced 1933 drama concerning a House Appropriations Committee tug-of-war is an engaging ensemble piece with startling parallels to 2012 politics. Especially recommended for Civics class geeks.

  • Reviews

    'Eterniday' Celebrates the Inexplicable

    With “Eterniday,” at La MaMa, author Charles Mee continues his collaboration with experimental dance-theater group Witness Relocation, in a raucously fun collage about connection.

  • Reviews

    The Misunderstanding

    This earnest production of an interesting early work by Albert Camus is more debate than drama, with complex intellectual arguments triumphing over emotional involvement.

  • Reviews

    Blues for Mister Charlie

    This brand-new professional company is a bit ahead of itself attempting James Baldwin's complex 1964 drama about race in America, but it deserves points for the attempt.

  • Reviews

    Pizza Man

    Darlene Craviotto's 1982 play is a preposterous concoction, so synthetic and phony that it makes "Three's Company" look like Molière, and Joan Kane's blaring direction doesn't mitigate the problem.