NY Fringe Festival

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  • Reviews

    The Apocalypse of John

    In “The Apocalypse of John,” a scatterbrained Fringe comedy from the Serious Theatre Collective, it’s the end of the world at the Players Theatre.

  • Reviews

    Blanche: The Bittersweet Life of a Wild Prairie Dame

    “Blanche: The Bittersweet Life of a Wild Prairie Dame,” Onalea Gilbertson’s Fringe Festival song cycle about her feisty grandmother, lacks craft but is an affecting love letter.

  • Reviews

    Mahmoud

    The lovely Tara Grammy proves that she’s a very talented woman with “Mahmoud,” a Fringe show that examines the lives of several Iranian expatriates living inToronto.

  • Reviews

    Chain Reaction

    In conveying the fascinating events behind the creation of the atomic bomb, Jonathan Alexandratos’ the Fringe show “Chain Reaction” unfortunately never settles on a tone.

  • Reviews

    Girl in Argentine Landscape

    Though not particularly incisive for a coming-of-age story, “Girl in Argentine Landscape,” at the Fringe, is brought to life with a riveting performance by author Naomi Grossman.

  • Reviews

    Panoramania; or the Adventures of John Banvard: An O’er True Tale

    Funded by a FordhamUniversity grant, “Panoramania” tries to revive the story of painter John Banvard, but this Fringe show is little more than a research paper set to music.

  • Reviews

    REDlight

    Ryan Kipp’s fragmentary “REDlight,” in the Fringe, is a brief collection of monologues linked by Gavin, a hunky young straight guy who works as an erotic dancer in a gay club.

  • Reviews

    Hadrian's Wall

    Dani Vetere’s “Hadrian’s Wall,” a Fringe entry, is a rather odd romantic-triangle drama about the hegemony of the male species with a lesbian twist.

  • Reviews

    Grimm

    A cursed necklace, a golden cloak, and potions figure in "Grimm," still another conflation of fairy tale stories, one better suited to “Sesame Street” than the stage, at the Fringe.

  • Reviews

    LOLPERA

    A new litter of singing and dancing felines hits the stage in Ellen Warkentine and Andrew Pedroza’s hysterical but uneven Fringe opera based on the Internet’s Lolcats photos.